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Author Topic: Ultimate Vindaloo  (Read 14541 times)

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Online Secret Santa

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Re: Ultimate Vindaloo
« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2014, 07:13 PM »
how it can be improved, what to use instead of vinegar (SS?)

How about none at all?  ;)

Ultimately (get it?) it comes down to what you're used to in your BIR vindaloos. If you are used to sour, vinegar infused vindaloos then that's what's right (for you) - no?

I can only tell you what is in the vindaloos I get and it definitely is not any vinegar of any kind. If you must use a souring agent I would plump for lemon dressing (not lemon juice - again far too acidic).

And just to make my position clear lest you think I'm just being bloody minded about the whole vindaloo/vinegar thing...I love vinegar...I mean really love it, it's just out of place in a vindaloo for me. I know this from making so called traditional vindaloos where vinegar is a definite prerequisite but wholly out of place unless you are cooking a fatty-pork vindaloo (i.e. authentically traditional) where the vinegar balances the rendered fat during the long cook and looses its potency.

The vinegary tasting BIR vindaloo is an embarassing attempt at the real thing.
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Re: Ultimate Vindaloo
« Reply #11 on: July 09, 2014, 07:19 PM »
Or you could do an SS Vinderloo and just add more chilli powder ;)

How very dare you!  ;D

I think I, along with JerryM, were a couple of the first forum members to insist that a vindaloo is not just a chillied-up madras.

And you are actually guilty of the same thing you seem to be implying because you're saying that a vindaloo needs differentiation from a madras just by the addition of...vinegar (and extra chilli of course)! Pffft!

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Offline Madrasandy

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Re: Ultimate Vindaloo
« Reply #12 on: July 09, 2014, 08:09 PM »
Hi SS thanks for your input, the vinegar when added early to the curry is cooked out and just leaves a tangy taste and not a vinegary taste, when the vinegar was added nearer the end of cooking it left a not very nice vinegary taste. I havent been overly happy with most vindaloo recipes I have tried so I did this experiment.
Quote
And you are actually guilty of the same thing you seem to be implying because you're saying that a vindaloo needs differentiation from a madras just by the addition of...vinegar (and extra chilli of course)! Pffft!
I never actually said that mate , I think you maybe just mis-understood me, Regards
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Offline Edwin Catflap

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Re: Ultimate Vindaloo
« Reply #13 on: July 09, 2014, 08:18 PM »
Hi SS

I thought a traditional portuguese influenced vindaloo was made with wine and garlic, rather than the more modern interpretation of vinegar and potato, I suppose the wine would be less acidic than vinegar

Ed

Offline JerryM

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Re: Ultimate Vindaloo
« Reply #14 on: July 09, 2014, 09:41 PM »
It's good to mull this over.

Obviously each to their own on the vinegar.

I'd like to crack this after or even before no3 madras.

The chef at my local TA said not to use vinegar in any dish. He did say some BIR do. He is Bangladeshi.

He also said to put tamerind in madras (i call no2 madras garlicky and tomatoey). He said no tamerind in vindaloo.

The other bir info was from midland chef who said birds eye chilli.

For me vindaloo is defo not a hot madras although lots of BIR think so.

It has to have lip burn. There is also a much greater depth of spice compared to madras. I am sure the recipe is simple.

I've tried nagga chilli which gives lip burn but not taste. Not tried a combo with birds eye. I had planned to up the amount of birds eye along with the ginger - these 2 seem key to getting ball park.

I also think the whole spice in madrasandy recipe could have been overlooked by myself as a differentiator to madras.

Will post recipe as is in case it prompts some ideas.

Offline Madrasandy

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Re: Ultimate Vindaloo
« Reply #15 on: July 09, 2014, 10:03 PM »
Great points Jerry
I shall take another look at not using the vinegar, it worked for me , but I am always up for any improvements or experiments to try, the chillis used were probably birds eye, they were short thin and green from the indian shop and were hotter than the longer chillis from there. Yes vindaloo definately has a greater depth of flavour , the dried red chillis gave a deeper flavour. I have tried Naga masala, naga chilli powder but none gave the flavour I was after.

This recipe did produce a belting vindaloo, and I am more than happy with the results from all the testing I did. I hope more people get time to try it and gave their feedback
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Offline littlechilie

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Re: Ultimate Vindaloo
« Reply #16 on: July 11, 2014, 07:38 AM »
Probably a bit trad but you could try some Tamarind. Or you could do an SS Vinderloo and just add more chilli powder ;)

This reminds me I ate a Madras from a curry house in North Wales this week, it was sour with Tamarind and I truly licked the plate clean.   
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Offline noble ox

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Re: Ultimate Vindaloo
« Reply #17 on: July 11, 2014, 08:17 AM »
Years ago I research Vindaloo origins
The Portugese and others when on long sea trips stored Pork in vinegar or starve so that makes the vinegar connection,  when reaching Goa add a few local spices and away you go
A bit of useless info but true or the start of a new debate ;D ;D

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Re: Ultimate Vindaloo
« Reply #18 on: July 11, 2014, 01:48 PM »
Years ago I research Vindaloo origins
The Portugese and others when on long sea trips stored Pork in vinegar or starve so that makes the vinegar connection,  when reaching Goa add a few local spices and away you go
A bit of useless info but true or the start of a new debate ;D ;D

Almost correct. They would load up the pork in barrels and add red whine to preserve it. On the long journey to india the wine would ferment into vinegar. This is why it's called Vinho (wine) d'alho (garlic) even though red wine vinegar (from the barrels) is the ingredient that's actually used.
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Offline Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Ultimate Vindaloo
« Reply #19 on: July 11, 2014, 02:39 PM »
Almost correct. They would load up the pork in barrels and add red whine to preserve it. On the long journey to india the wine would ferment into vinegar. This is why it's called Vinho (wine) d'alho (garlic) even though red wine vinegar (from the barrels) is the ingredient that's actually used.

You have not explained the "d'alho (garlic)" element, Santa.
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