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Author Topic: Mick's/Taz's Dopiaza (Madras Hot)  (Read 17636 times)

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Offline Cory Ander

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Re: Mick's/Taz's Dopiaza (Madras Hot)
« Reply #20 on: January 13, 2010, 08:41 AM »
Please don't get me wrong, though, UB.  This relatively simple base, relatively simple spice mix and relatively simple method still produces very nice curries...which just goes to show how keeping it simple can still be very effective, I suppose.
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CA :)

Offline matt3333

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Re: Mick's/Taz's Dopiaza (Madras Hot)
« Reply #21 on: January 14, 2010, 09:47 AM »
Please don't get me wrong, though, UB.  This relatively simple base, relatively simple spice mix and relatively simple method still produces very nice curries...which just goes to show how keeping it simple can still be very effective, I suppose.

Interesting interpretation of a method used by a restaurant chef-

Relatively simple spice mix-
The Taz spice mix appears to be very similar to nearly every spice mix i've looked at predominantly Tumeric,Corriander,Cumin and Curry powder, indeed the first 3 ingredients make up 70% of Taz mix compared to 62% in yours and the ingredients are exactly the same as a mix from Secret Santa described as being direct from a restaurant.

Relatively simple base-
The base contains Onions, garlic,ginger,pepper,tomato,oil and spices again similar to nearly every other base I've looked at. Other bases may contain a few variations carrot,potato, and fresh corriander.
But basically not alot of difference.

Relatively simple method-
This to me is where the main difference from other techniques lies, spices are not cooked in hot oil at the beginning as in most techniques but added initally to the base.
As the base evaporates using high heat it thickens and the extra oil which the base contains starts to cook the spices in what i found to be a far more controlled way. This is not relatively simple and requires experience in evaporating the base sufficiently and gauging when the spices have released their flavours.
Beyond this stage the method becomes similar to other techniques.

As with most things it comes down to personal taste but I have produced some excellent curries with this technique.
I would suggest that the cooking technique could be used with any base and spice mix so anyone wanting a change from their current method why not give it a go.
Ramblings over ;)
Matt



Offline PaulP

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Re: Mick's/Taz's Dopiaza (Madras Hot)
« Reply #22 on: January 14, 2010, 01:16 PM »
Hi Matt,

Yes it works very well for me too. It's not easy deciding when you have reduced enough and I'm still experimenting at this. I think if you failed to reduce enough and failed to do the "scrape backs" it probably would taste bland.

Since joining this forum I must admit I've only tried 2 bases, the SnS 2008 one which I've done to death and lately the Taz one.

The opinions of the people who taste my food including me give the Taz curries the edge over the SnS 2008 curries I produced.

Next base for me is CA's one which I hope to do this weekend.


Offline Derek Dansak

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Re: Mick's/Taz's Dopiaza (Madras Hot)
« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2010, 02:03 PM »
Hi Ca, yes i see your point. I expect i am aiming a lot higher than most. I grew up in a family of cooks so i guess its in the blood. Although other family members always say to me " why dont you try some other types of cooking". I just stare blankly back at them looking puzzled !!

Josh And Ub and others, its interesting to hear how you guys have a totally different method to me. I have stuck with making plain bases with little oil, prefering to add heaps of oil at the final stage of making a curry. Recently i took this to a new level with an even plainer base (very similar to the real bir base i tried) and trippled up the spicing in the final curry. increasing the evaporation stage by 5 mins. fantastic results. not at all bland like so many cro curries i have tried.  I believe a very plain base is great for evaporation, and also shows up your mistakes more. This allows subsequent tweaks to recipies to be easier to gauge.  However i am sure every person needs to find the right method for them, and develop it incrementally. I cannot possibly imagine what CA,s UBs or Joshes curries taste like. Wish i could ! I can only compare mine to real TA,s, which is tough.

Online Secret Santa

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Re: Mick's/Taz's Dopiaza (Madras Hot)
« Reply #24 on: January 14, 2010, 11:18 PM »
I have stuck with making plain bases with little oil, prefering to add heaps of oil at the final stage of making a curry. Recently i took this to a new level with an even plainer base (very similar to the real bir base i tried) and trippled up the spicing in the final curry.

The logical continuation of this is that you reduce the base to boiled onions only and, while the BIRs may not do this, I see no reason not to take that route.

Quote
I believe a very plain base is great for evaporation, and also shows up your mistakes more. This allows subsequent tweaks to recipies to be easier to gauge.

Couldn't agree more! Which is why I tend to dislike bases with large amounts of tomato.
Fighting for truth, justice and the BIR way!

Offline Derek Dansak

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Re: Mick's/Taz's Dopiaza (Madras Hot)
« Reply #25 on: January 15, 2010, 10:28 AM »
Hi Secret Santa, yes too much tomato is not good, i prefer to add that at the curry making stage, in the form of lots of tomato puree. Adding the tomato too early to base is also not good. i was genuinly shocked that the closest base i have made to the real bir base i once tasted was my most simple base. i left out the carrot, most of the typical spices. the texture of the final curry was spot on. It makes sense that bir would use very simple recipies for the base, as they make  so much of the dam stuff.

Offline Derek Dansak

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Re: Mick's/Taz's Dopiaza (Madras Hot)
« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2010, 11:03 AM »
SS, i would disagree that an onion only base would work well (although it would work ) . i feel that salt garlic and and some tomato , and red pepper are essential to get the right undertone. The trouble with an onion only base would be adjusting the final recipe for all the missing garlic, tomato, . it could be done though. But then it would be traditional indian cookery!

Offline Paul1980

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Re: Mick's/Taz's Dopiaza (Madras Hot)
« Reply #27 on: February 09, 2010, 03:40 PM »
Well said Matt333 and PaulP I couldn't agree more!!!
I was always under the impression BIR's and TA's would always keep their bases simple due to cost and time and add what spices needed when making individual curries.

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Re: Mick's/Taz's Dopiaza (Madras Hot)
« Reply #28 on: February 10, 2010, 10:13 AM »

Yes it works very well for me too. It's not easy deciding when you have reduced enough and I'm still experimenting at this. I think if you failed to reduce enough and failed to do the "scrape backs" it probably would taste bland.


This point is totally correct,
If this is not done correctly then the curry will not have the fully developed flavours,
If done correctly then the curry will most certainly not be bland, it may not be to everyones taste but it won't be bland,

Mick
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Offline Paul1980

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Re: Mick's/Taz's Dopiaza (Madras Hot)
« Reply #29 on: April 20, 2010, 03:06 PM »
Just thought I would post to say I have made 5 different types of curries with this base and method from A Korma to a Jalfrezi. Spot on every time.
Some more recipe's from Taz would be nice?


 


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