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Author Topic: New video from Julian at Curry2Go - Shortcut to takeaway style curry  (Read 6854 times)

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Offline benmitchell88

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Seems Julian has posted a new video tonight on using a shortcut to create takeaway style curries -  ::)

Short cut to a Takeaway style curry

He claims, using this method isn't far off using a base gravy / sauce (Which I would have to try to believe)  ;)

Has anyone else tried this method, if so... what were you findings?  :-\



Ben

Offline beachbum

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It starts off very similar to Australian Indian Recipe procedure. There, the oil is "seasoned in the pan" with some whole spices such as cinnamon quills, cardmom, a couple of cloves etc. Then the onion mix is added and fried.

Where they diverge is that with AIR the mix is fried longer until caramelisation is under way, the GGP is added at that stage then all the tomato and all the spice mix and cooked thick, diluted a bit if it gets too thick and cooked till the oil glistens and the onions have well and truly disintegrated, thus no stick blending.

Then on assembling with the precooked chicken the idea is to dilute it to desired texture, as opposed to reducing a runny gravy. Also many Aussie restaurants add coconut milk powder to Madras to give more of a Southern Indian flavour rather than Northern / Punjabi.

Wouldn't mind seeing if I can get a couple of those spice packs to try. In the past I have done a hybrid method using blended raw onions, Garlic and Ginger fried with a few water additions until cooked and then spices and tomato added to make more of a BIR gravy, worked quite well as a quick fix. 



Offline SteveAUS

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BB, I was sat their thinking, yeah this is what I do and how I was taught to do traditional indian cooking until he blended the softened (not caramelised) onions. It was a bit of a mix n match really wasnt it. Interesting but. I reckon you could probably work out what goes in the spice mixes depending on what you are cooking surely rather than getting one sent down here?

The only time I use a blender is when i make a saag lamb. I fry the onions and blend with toms, stock, spices, spinach, cream, methi etc and then add this green creamy gravy to the browned seasoned lamb for a slow cook.

Cheers
Steve

Offline Peripatetic Phil

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BB, I was sat their thinking, yeah this is what I do and how I was taught to do traditional indian cooking until he blended the softened (not caramelised) onions. It was a bit of a mix n match really wasnt it. Interesting but. I reckon you could probably work out what goes in the spice mixes depending on what you are cooking surely rather than getting one sent down here?
Yes, I switched off (both mentally and physically) as soon as he started pushing the spice mixes; informative videos I like, a sales pitch wrapped up in a video much less so.  Ah well.

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Offline solarsplace

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Hi

Years ago, before I discovered CR0 and learned about base gravy etc I used to by curry kits from this place on the link below. They have been going years - I must admit to be very grateful to them - helping a complete novice at curry cooking actually produce a tasty curry.

http://www.123curry.co.uk/123curry/asp/instant-curry-kits.asp

The method to make curry with these kits is "interestingly" identical to the method described in the video where one creates a quick onion based sauce. Each curry kit used to come with a little recipe booklet too. It would probably be interesting to try the kit again having now more experience with how to properly fry spice etc for emergencies such as running out of base gravy.

At the time the curry produced was very tasty indeed but a long way from the curry from a BIR.

Cheers

Offline Salvador Dhali

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Having tried all these 'short cut' methods (and more) over the last 30 years or so, I actually find it less faff to peel and quarter three or four onions and make a quick Taz style base (or even a small version of any base).

If you calculate the time it takes to dick about finely slicing onions, frying them off and then still having to blend them (as you do with a base anyway) there's little in it. In fact, if you take away the actual cooking time of the base (time you can use to precook the meat, make some sides, etc), I'd say in terms of prep it's quicker to get everything together to make a small base, and the results will be much more BIR. AND you'll be left with enough base to make a few more curries the next day (or to freeze).

Bottom line for me is that when it comes to BIR, there's no such thing as a short cut*.


*Actually, this isn't true. After all, the whole BIR process is comprised of a series of carefully crafted 'short cuts' designed to enable a chef to get a curry to plate or foil container in 8-10 minutes. What I mean is that there's no short cut to achieving the desired end result.

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Offline Cory Ander

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the whole BIR process is comprised of a series of carefully crafted 'short cuts' designed to enable a chef to get a curry to plate or foil container in 8-10 minutes.

I agree, 100%.  British Indian Restaurant cooking IS the shortcut (to traditional Indian cooking - which is what this video resembles). 

The only other "shortcut" is to cut down on the cooking time for the ("normal") curry base (for example) by making a much reduced quantity (of which there are many examples on this forum...some taking less than an hour to make).

The technique, in the video, is much like that which I (and, I'm sure, many others) employed some decades ago and which is commonly portrayed (perhaps excluding the blending) in the plethora of traditional Indian cooking cookbooks.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2012, 03:18 PM by Cory Ander »
Regards,

CA :)

Online Curry Barking Mad

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Having tried all these 'short cut' methods (and more) over the last 30 years or so, I actually find it less faff to peel and quarter three or four onions and make a quick Taz style base (or even a small version of any base).

If you calculate the time it takes to dick about finely slicing onions, frying them off and then still having to blend them (as you do with a base anyway) there's little in it. In fact, if you take away the actual cooking time of the base (time you can use to precook the meat, make some sides, etc), I'd say in terms of prep it's quicker to get everything together to make a small base, and the results will be much more BIR. AND you'll be left with enough base to make a few more curries the next day (or to freeze).

Bottom line for me is that when it comes to BIR, there's no such thing as a short cut*.


*Actually, this isn't true. After all, the whole BIR process is comprised of a series of carefully crafted 'short cuts' designed to enable a chef to get a curry to plate or foil container in 8-10 minutes. What I mean is that there's no short cut to achieving the desired end result.

I couldn't agree more SD.
If you are new to BIR currying, this 'shortcut' may have it's merits but to all intents and purposes make a small base instead of a larger one but do it each time is not for me. Especially considering Julian says they don't get you all the way there.

You do have to admire him though and his ability to reinvent the wheel with his 'spice kits'.

I bet that wasn't a happy band of pupils at his 'cooking class facility' when the gas ran out ::)
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Offline curry2gochorley

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 :) Hi,  just to clarify- this 'Shortcut' method is something that will appeal to a few who don't want the faff of making a base at 11pm at night if the are out of it- it is a compromise but quite honestly guys try it as I surprised myself with how good the results were.  Obviously I promote making base gravy everytime to get the exact taste people are looking for in recreating BIR and obviously myself and our other chef's at Curry 2 Go make base gravy every day- but you wouldn't believe how many people ask me 'is there a short cut?'  hence I made that video.

One little extra tip to try;  When you add the onion paste(base) fry it pretty dry as this has the effect of sweetening the sauce slightly which is mimicking what happens with a a real base- you need to do this (I show it in the video) and then you will be surprised how close a result you get!

I would be interested to hear what you think once you have tried it!

Julian

Offline Malc.

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Julian, if at 11pm at night I am 'out of it', the last thing I would be doing is 'faffing' about with your shortcut method. Forgetting the potential catastrophe of splashing boiling base over me whilst fumbling around the pan with a blender, I would opt for the safer and quicker option, of ordering a take-away for delivery, trust me!  ;)


I appreciate what you are doing and take my hat off to you for taking the initiative in making a few bob out of it, but to suggest on here that this is a suitable alternative, well, I feel you are not giving us the credit we deserve.


Good luck with your endeavours. :)
 



 


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