Curry Recipes Online

British Indian Restaurant Recipe Requests => British Indian Restaurant Recipe Requests => Topic started by: livo on November 16, 2013, 03:11 AM

Title: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on November 16, 2013, 03:11 AM
Hello curry cooks,  I'm a newbie here but have been doing Indian / Sri Lankan for many years. 

I was going to post here:-
http://www.curry-recipes.co.uk/curry/index.php/topic,11619.0.html (http://www.curry-recipes.co.uk/curry/index.php/topic,11619.0.html)
But had a message about the thread being more than 120 days old and advising a new topic so here it is.

I also posted this request in another recent thread in Pictures of your curries, where a search for "Mango Chicken" led me straight up. here:-
http://www.curry-recipes.co.uk/curry/index.php/topic,12391.msg101321.html#msg101321 (http://www.curry-recipes.co.uk/curry/index.php/topic,12391.msg101321.html#msg101321)

I'm looking for Mango Chicken.  Not the stuff that comes up in search engines but the stuff that comes up when you search through the menus of most Indian Restaurants around the world.

Tender boneless pieces of chicken in a mild creamy mango sauce.  I can buy it in any number of Takeaways / Dine-ins, but do you think I can find the way to cook it at home.  I know for a fact that others also seek this dish as I have been searching for quite some time, and across other forums, and found other people looking but there is never an answer.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Bengali Bob on November 16, 2013, 12:11 PM
Hi livo, welcome the forum. I don't have a mango chicken recipe but someone else may be be able to help you, The thread below is also worth a read, re, the type of mango pulp (kesar).  The restaurant referred to doesn't actually list mango chicken on the menu (which is surprising as mango pulp goes in many of their dishes), but they do have a chicken meva. Apparently this is chicken pieces cooked with mango and lychee in a mild and spicy sauce. I'll look into it. If I order it I should be able to see the chef make it, and can also ask him about mango chicken itself.

http://www.curry-recipes.co.uk/curry/index.php/topic,12163.0.html (http://www.curry-recipes.co.uk/curry/index.php/topic,12163.0.html)

Rob  :)
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Aussie Mick on November 16, 2013, 03:16 PM
Hi Livo

We do mango chicken and it's a good seller.

We add 1/3 portion of korma sauce, 1/3 portion of butter chicken sauce(our recipe is on here), 1/3 base gravy and add a good 5 tbsps of mango pulp. Add chicken, heat through thoroughly and that's it.

May be a bit of faffing about to make up korma and butter chicken, but you can freeze the remainder for further recipes.

You could probably get away with just korma/base 50/50, plus the mango pulp.  8)

I
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on November 16, 2013, 08:39 PM
Thank you both, Rob and Mick. 

@Rob:- I'd already looked at the link you provided. I found it yesterday but the dish I'm looking at is usually a very creamy, velvety gravy / sauce and listed as mild.

@Mick:- I can buy it anywhere in 5 places within 30 minutes (1 hour return) from home with the closest place 15km away as I live in a rural area.  They are always a little bit different (as you'd expect) from shop to shop, but the basic concept is pretty uniform. I'm from the Central Coast of NSW and I can get it at the main Curry houses around Gosford area. I'm presently living around Lake Macquarie, and can get it close to home or in Newcastle. I've had it in Sydney and in Tamworth.

I've been able to come close but just never quite get it.  I do know that it uses canned puree of Alphonso Mango as I once caught a glimpse of the cook starting a new batch after I bought the last of it.  I have made blends of Butter Chicken with Mango, Korma with Mango, just Mango with yogurt, cream and coconut and mixtures of the above. I've tried small amounts of powders etc but just cannot get the dish right.

It is very frustrating that it is so commonly available but is shrouded in mystery.  I was a school teacher and had a student who's father was the cook at one of the stores. They would not tell me and just grinned at me when I asked.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Stephen Lindsay on November 16, 2013, 08:47 PM
Interesting thread - I've never come across this dish in Scotland or England but hey ho it looks like the kind of dish some would love.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on November 16, 2013, 09:07 PM
Forgot to add, I've tried various nuts, cashews ground and in butter form (like peanut butter but cashew), ground almond meal, ground pistachio.  I also bought a small container of both Asafoetida and Amchoor, grasping at straws for a mystery ingredient.

One of the closest things I came across was a dish called a Mango Puliserry, to which I added chicken,  but again not quite right.

Another thing is that it seems to be chicken prepared either as a mild Tikka or Tandoori or possibly just pre-cooked before going into the gravy. When you ask they just nod and say yes.

One store in Newcastle actually has a little market next door and when I asked in there I was told, Mango pulp, coconut milk and a little Garam Masala.  I knew without trying that this was not even near the right thing.  They just wont tell.

I've been trying to make variations of this dish for the best part of 10 years, and on some days have had my kitchen littered with dozens of experimental samples.  No prize yet.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on November 16, 2013, 09:16 PM
Hi Livo

We do mango chicken and it's a good seller.

We add 1/3 portion of korma sauce, 1/3 portion of butter chicken sauce(our recipe is on here), 1/3 base gravy and add a good 5 tbsps of mango pulp. Add chicken, heat through thoroughly and that's it.

May be a bit of faffing about to make up korma and butter chicken, but you can freeze the remainder for further recipes.

You could probably get away with just korma/base 50/50, plus the mango pulp.  8)

I

Hey Mick,
What chicken do you use?  Plain raw, pre-cooked (boiled in spice / flavouring), Tandoor or Tikka?

The dish is usually a very orange colour (probably food colouring as the mango pulp doesn't hold up in colour with the other sauces).  I found one reference in a restaurant menu to the use of Deghi murch, which I found is Kashmiri Chilli powder (deggi mirch), used for colour, but I imagine this would also provide heat and the dish is never hot. I have only seen it as "Mild" and on one menu listing as "Medium".
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Secret Santa on November 16, 2013, 10:43 PM
The dish is usually a very orange colour

Possibly base sauce, tandoori masala paste and korma paste/sauce - and mango puree of course?

I can imagine that being well tasty even if not the right mix.

Can you explain the flavours a bit more - what other dishes does it compare to?
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on November 16, 2013, 11:20 PM
This is the thing. It tastes like Mango Chicken.  It is not a korma but it is mild.  It is sweet but not sickly. It is mild but complex.  It does not have definite flavours of coconut, or heat of chili.

It tastes like Mango Chicken.  I can't even say for sure if it contains a base gravy or any onions for that matter.  I simply do not know how to describe it other than delicious and the kids love it.  It is like chicken for desert.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Aussie Mick on November 17, 2013, 03:40 AM
Hi Livo

We use pre-cooked chicken (boiled in turmeric and salt)

I had never heard of the dish before our tandoor chef taught me our way of cooking it. I'll ask him how and "Indian" restaurant would cook the dish.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on November 17, 2013, 05:15 AM
Now you've got me confused. I thought we were talking about how an "Indian" restaurant would cook it.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Aussie Mick on November 17, 2013, 02:25 PM
Now you've got me confused. I thought we were talking about how an "Indian" restaurant would cook it.

Sorry for the confusion. i meant how an "Indian" restaurant rather than a "British Indian" restaurant.

I don't know whether you realise, but the vast majority of UK "Indian" restaurants are actually Bangladeshi or Pakistani owned, whereas in OZ, most are owned by Indians, that is why the food is completely different.

Anyway, I asked Raj (our Indian tandoori chef) how mango chicken would be made in Aussie Indian kitchens, and he said that they would use butter chicken sauce and mango pulp. Nothing else.

Most butter chicken gravies would also contain cashew gravy, so maybe that is what is missing from your attempts.  8)

Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on November 17, 2013, 08:25 PM
OK. So that is understandable but still a little disappointing.  The slight variations from shop to shop would be from the variation to individual butter chicken sauce. 

Which is your butter chicken gravy mentioned above?  Could you provide a link to it?

edit: don't worry . Found it

Could use help with the Cashew Gravy though.

I still think it will still be requiring cream or curd or something, maybe coconut cream, or a mixture of these.  Maybe not. I can see I still have some experimentation to do.  I have been down the path of Butter Chicken / Mango Pulp before and as I say it is nice to eat and similar but not the same.  I've also experimented with cashews before.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: chewytikka on November 17, 2013, 10:25 PM
G'day livo
Absolutely no idea how Indian Chefs (AIR) in Australia cook this dish,
as Mick says, it's a different kitchen system.

But this is a real restaurant recipe, Bangladeshi BIR, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

Mango Chicken is a simple mild delicate BIR curry.
But its not cooked in a delicate way, (Another High Heat Curry)

Hot pan
Add 3Tbs Veg Oil -1min
Touch of G&G -10secs.

Quickly add and combine
1Tbs Almond Powder, 1Tsp White Sugar.
2Tbs Tomato Puree dilute,1heaped Tsp Mix Powder.
Tarka this 30sec then in with 250ml Base Gravy.
Mix, stir and bring to the boil (High Heat) -1min.

Add 75ml Kesar Mango Pulp, mix, stir and keep on the boil 2 minutes.
Add the precooked Chicken pieces, Keep on high heat 2 minutes
Add 100ml single cream and combine well.

Turn down to medium heat and just let it sit and reduce a little -2-3 minutes.
Give it the odd stir, the sauce will thicken and become silky/creamy and ready to serve.

Should look like this - ;) cheers Chewy

(http://www.curry-recipes.co.uk/imagehost/pics/80a0bbc3be90ecdccc18473a9062bbb1.jpg) (http://www.curry-recipes.co.uk/imagehost/#80a0bbc3be90ecdccc18473a9062bbb1.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Micky Tikka on November 17, 2013, 10:36 PM
Well done Chewy
You are the Curry Doctor  :)
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on November 17, 2013, 11:00 PM
Thank you so much CT.  This looks very promising.  :)

It's absolutely pouring rain here today so I'll give it a go, since I can't go fishing.

It doesn't really matter, but what does it say there for white sugar or "any???" (something wrong with characters after any)?

I have alphonso mango pulp but that is what I've seen used over here.  It wont make too much difference and I'll try some different mango types as they arrive this season.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on November 18, 2013, 05:53 AM
Well now we're getting somewhere.  This is the closest I've come yet and I have to say it is not terribly unlike other versions I've eaten, but still not exactly what I'm after.  I can't thank CT enough as I now have the knowledge I needed to get experimenting and I'm definitely on the right track.

My fussy daughter is the judge and she says it is still "too much like a curry" and not yet rich enough.  So the first thing I'll do is pre-cook the chicken in a milder base gravy, (although I don't think that's the problem), using less mix powder and possibly even none.  After that when I'm actually assembling the dish, I'll again use less base and more mango and possibly more almond meal as well to thicken it a bit more.

The dishes out here, at least the one I'm trying to replicate, are very sweet mango, but with a richness and velvet creaminess with only a hint of spice.

I'm still open to suggestions, but this is the best result so far in over 10 years of trying.

Now to make a Rogan Josh to go with it for my own dinner.

I'll let you know how the next few variations work out and hopefully I'll get that "Eureka" moment.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on November 18, 2013, 07:46 AM
Seeing as I've done CT's Mango Chicken, I also found his 2 pan Rogan Josh and did that as well, only in lamb and the meat wasn't pre-cooked so I just did the 2 pans, mixed them together and in the Pressure Cooker for 20 minutes.

Smells unreal. Also did a Palak Paneer or Saag Paneer, whatever it is, to satisfy the missus.  Loves her fresh spinach.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: loveitspicy on November 18, 2013, 11:57 AM
Livo

why not try a level tsp mixed powder and a dollop more cream - i think you may get it then

best, Rich
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: chewytikka on November 18, 2013, 01:09 PM
Nice one livo :)

Dishes like this one, are the main reason my BIR restaurants make a neutral base gravy.
Maybe a good idea to get your daughter to taste your base gravy first, before you start.

If she thinks it tastes too '"curry strong", reduce your spicing in your next batch,
or you could try my 1 hour base, which is neutral

Anyhoo, Glad to help in your curry quest.

Curry on ;)
cheers Chewy
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Secret Santa on November 18, 2013, 09:19 PM
I think I see why livo's had so much trouble replicating this 'curry'. It's because it's not a curry at all, it's a chicken dessert!  ;D
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on November 20, 2013, 09:21 PM
Exactly right. But now we have it. The mystery is solved.  No wonder the restaurant people I'd asked about it just grin and say yes to any question asked.

I am now 100% confident that within a half dozen more attempts with minor variations, I will have a dish that is acceptable to Fussy Daughter No 1.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: swagatsaintjohn on March 31, 2014, 01:31 AM

My husband said that this was a best seller at the restaurant he worked at in Munich. We have been searching for a recipe to make as we are going to start selling Indian at the local farmers market. We called the chefs in Munich but we could not find a recipe on the internet that even came close to sounding the way the chefs there described it to us.

Made the variation on the recipe from this form for dinner this evening - butter chicken sauce and mango pulp. I added a touch of coconut milk to give it an extra bit of creaminess. Absolutely brilliant! Will be on the menu at our farmers market stall this summer. Thanks Aussie Mick
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on October 31, 2014, 11:00 PM
Cooked this using Kushi pre-cooked chicken last night and it is the best I've ever made. Absolutely delicious and the daughter and her friend are eating it with Jasmine Rice for breakfast as I type this.  Only thing missing was the ice cream.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on February 21, 2018, 05:49 AM
Here I go again. The quest continues.   :o  Here is a selection of Restaurant Menu descriptions for Mango Chicken. Many of these are Australian (because that's what Google wants to show me) but similar were found in menus from New Zealand, Athens, New York and Europe including the UK.  Is the UK still considered part of Europe?  ::) When I was last frequenting this site my ancestral home was voting to leave the Union and I think something called Brexit happened as well.  Over the last couple of years I have had PM's and emails from people interested in finding the way to prepare this dish after trying it in various parts of the globe so it is not confined to Australia.  All descriptions contain mention of boneless chicken pieces with some specifying breast or thigh and we could possibly assume it is pre-cooked.  One description clearly stated Tandoor Cooked Chicken Tikka pieces in the Mango sauce.

"subtle marsala spices, cream and mango"
"creamy mango flavoured gravy"
"mouth-watering mango sauce with spices"
"creamy mango gravy with curry leaf and mustard"
"chef's specially prepared sauce with mango"
"creamy, rich, spicy and sweet mango gravy sauce"
"Classic mango chicken curry in rich mango sweet sauce"
"mango pulp, cream, garlic, ginger and spices"
"onion, ginger, garlic, tomato, creamy mango flavoured sauce"
"delicious mango flavoured cream and lightly spiced sauce"
"fresh ripe mangos and smooth cream"
"mango sauce with mustard, curry leaves and fresh cream"

It is interesting that none of these descriptions includes any mention of coconut or coconut milk while most recipes on the net inevitably contain it.  Nor is there any mention of nuts other than I did find one description that included cashews and dried fruits.  In this instance the photographed dish showed them as being whole and possibly almost a garnish.  Some photographs do definitely show a slivered almond garnish.  Also worth noting is that 2 of the descriptions above specifically mention curry leaf and mustard.  I can't say I've seen actual mustard seeds or curry leaves in any of the restaurant versions I've had.

There are literally hundreds of recipes for Mango Chicken of one type or another on the net and from my many experiments over the years, and with the knowledge provided by Chewytikka here on this forum, I can immediately discount most of them.  Some of them are quite amusing 4 ingredient throw togethers while others appear to be extremely complicated and laborious processes.  I'm reasonably sure that the restaurant versions will be somewhere in between.  I do have some promising new lines for further investigation but there are also many unanswered questions and for now it appears to be a bit like a quest for the Holy Grail. The difference is that I know Mango Chicken exists.  Most promising recipe leads I've recently found are prepared in the traditional method, so not how a restaurant or TA would cook them, but I'm confident in being able to perform the necessary transposition in methodology.  I've done so in the past with different dishes and good success.

A couple of notable ingredient consistencies that appear to pop up in many online recipes are green cardamom and cinnamon stick and red capsicum or red pepper depending on the origin.  Specifically mentioned Tomato sauce with mango popped up once that I saw.

PS: It is interesting to see that this thread has been viewed over 7000 times.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Peripatetic Phil on February 21, 2018, 12:50 PM
I confess that (a), mango chicken is not a dish I have ever seen on a UK Indian restaurant menu, and (b) even if I had seen it, I would almost certainly not have tried it, as I prefer my savoury dishes to be savoury and my sweet dishes to be sweet[1].  But I commend you whole-heartedly in your efforts to re-create a dish that you and your family love, and wish you every success.

** Phil.
--------
[1] Although I notice that not only is the gravy in a Fray Bentos steak-and-kidney pie (which I love) slightly sweet, but so was the sauce prepared by our sous-chef Chris for his steak-and-ale pie which Le Khanh & I ate during the week (and which was also delicious).
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: chewytikka on February 21, 2018, 01:20 PM
Ignore the previous Troll ::)

Livo, this might help you on your quest again.

Try my BIR Malai Makhoni recipe, very quick and simple.
Just add 4 tbsp sweet Mango pulp. Which will turn it into Mango Chicken.

I’ve used canned Mango in syrup but thats my BIR Mango Delight recipe.
Very child friendly.


cheers ChewyTikka
N.B. All Muglai style BIR dishes are a light cream and yellow colour.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on February 21, 2018, 09:31 PM
Thank you again Chewy. I will examine this recipe further today as I have left over pre-cooked chicken in the fridge.  I had noticed previously, in my global menu searching for clues, that the UK equivalent dish (or at least very similar) could be called Mango Delight.  I'm sure you already know this but your advice a few years back saw the single largest progression towards my end goal.  Prior to that, I was getting nowhere.  Suddenly I was immediately more than 9/10ths of the way there.

I hear you Phil. I usually have a savoury flavour preference and rarely eat sweats or deserts with my favourite treat being liquorice (and Ouzo, the spicy curry of spirits). However, a good version of this dish, once tried, really is something quite special and certainly very moreish. For some people, the rating of an Indian restaurant is based on the quality of their Tikka and Mango Chicken and a trip to the Indian banquet for an Aussie family inevitably includes the Mango Chicken and Cheese Naan for the kids.

Of course the side benefit of looking for this recipe is that I eventually found this site. My interest in the BIR style was triggered.

Incidentally, since I first started researching how to cook this dish, I've added a son who is now 17 and my 2 daughters have reached adulthood.  They still like Mango Chicken despite my obsession.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on February 23, 2018, 06:10 AM
 ;D Rippa, bonza, you bloody beauty rip-snorter, Wow, mystery solved.  If Chewytikka lived in Australia I'd try to have him declared a living national treasure, build a bronze statue in Hyde Park and have him elected to govern in perpetuity. We're not very fussy down here as you'd know if you've followed our political scene of late.  Sorry, but after 20 years what do I do now? I guess I have to go back to the failed to crack dish thread and recant now.

Chewy's latest contribution has elevated me to at least 98% mission accomplished or better.  Still a few minor things to iron out but this is the Eureka moment (another Aussie thing). I think the base gravy is still a bit strong. I used Misty Ricardo's ebook base and I didn't dilute because I require the thickness in body and mouth feel. The finished dish can't be watery at all as we typically don't have our curry as wet as you guys, or so it would seem.   I think it does need to be, as you advised years ago, a very neutral base with minimal spicing or I have to leave out the mix powder completely in the assembly cooking process.  I can take care of this.

I do have one important question however.  Almond powder?  Are we talking Almond Flour or Almond Meal?  Even though Almond meal is well ground it does still impart a slightly grainy consistency which I'd rather avoid to get closer to the preferred finish.  I could not buy Almond Flour even though my research says it exists.  There is an obvious cultural or geographic variation in the naming of certain ingredients down here.  The most obvious is what you call tomato puree we call tomato paste. Down here puree and pasata are the same thing pretty much where as Paste is a triple concentrated substance almost the consistency of toothpaste.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Garp on February 23, 2018, 06:44 PM
Misty also does a Mango Chicken Curry

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TCkL_LMGQg8 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TCkL_LMGQg8)
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on February 23, 2018, 10:30 PM
Thanks Garp, that does look good. It appears to be similar to the traditional Indian sub-continent Mango Curries that do look delicious and it is certainly on the list of dishes to try out. 

The Malai Makhoni that CT has just shown us, and then on to his Chicken Delight by the addition of mango puree, is as close as I've ever been.  I would be satisfied I'm there with some very minor modifications from the dish in my fridge right now. Perhaps the use of the Malai Tikka instead of base gravy pre-cooked chicken.  Some menu descriptions do mention Tikka, albeit not specifically Malai.  I need to further reduce the spicing or possibly use a very neutral, low spiced base and I need to examine the use of almond meal vs almond flour for the velvety smooth mouth feel.

The dish I've been looking for is really stretching the definition of the word curry. It has meat and sauce and that is about as far as it can be stretched.  This will sound very weird to people who love Chili Hot Curry but Korma people will get it.  You have to try to imagine a Mango Lassi , or creamy mango smoothy with extremely mild spicing and pre-cooked or tikka chicken.  I know it sounds odd but that is a description of the dish and why kids love it.

This is why it has been so hard to explain to people in the Curry circle what the dish is like.  It is like a desert curry.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on February 26, 2018, 09:38 PM
The most recently prepared dish received the thumbs up from number 1 daughter so I know I'm on the right track.  I've sourced a bag of Almond Flour to try in place of the Almond Meal and I've made a new batch of very mild base gravy using coconut oil and ghee in place of vegetable oil  I'll go and buy some chicken breast and some double cream today and give it another try.  It is very close to the desired dish now.

Both Almond Meal and Almond Flour are considered as Almond Powder which is confusing.  Meal is whole almonds, skin and all ground to the meal while flour is  blanched almonds which are ground to a much finer powder as used for French macaroons.  I'll see if it makes the desired difference.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on March 01, 2018, 08:24 PM
Well after my most recent attempt I have no doubt the dish is only a fingernail away. The neutral, but sweet, base gravy helped immensely. I'm not happy with the grainy texture still present,  even with the use of very fine almond flour. The individual grains swell in the cooking process and prevent the smooth gravy effect.
I've bought some uht long-life almond milk to try next time around but I may also need a different thickening agent. Perhaps roasted gram flour. I'm also going to try a cook without almonds altogether. They may not be required at all.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on March 02, 2018, 11:07 PM
The judgement is done. No 1 daughter says that she would no be able to tell this didn't come from the Restaurant / Takeaway.  I still want to fine tune a couple of little things but maybe I'm being a bit too pedantic. 

Mission accomplished. ;D
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: southsussex on May 20, 2018, 01:20 PM
Dan Toombs has just bought out a new 'Easy' curry book and this mango chicken recipe, also replicated in the Mail, features:

2tbsp rapeseed oil
2tbsp mixed garlic and ginger paste
1tbsp mixed powder
1tsp chilli powder
3tbsp finely chopped coriander stalks
2 fresh green chillies, thinly sliced
600ml (1pt) base curry sauce, warm
6tbsp coconut flour (from supermarkets)
4tbsp smooth mango chutney
700g (1lb 8oz) cooked chicken
1 small mango, cut into bite-sized chunks
Salt
1tsp garam masala
1tsp dried methi leaves
3tbsp finely chopped coriander leaves, to serve
Heat the oil in a large frying pan over a medium-high heat. Stir in the mixed garlic and ginger paste and let it fry for 30 seconds. Stir in the mixed powder and chilli powder, along with the finely chopped coriander stalks and fresh chillies.

Stir everything really well into the hot oil, then add 250ml of the base sauce. Let this come to a rolling simmer, stirring only if it is sticking to the pan. Add the coconut flour, mango chutney and 125ml of the base sauce. Stir in the chicken and heat through for 1 minute in the sauce.

Now add the mango chunks and the rest of the base sauce. Stir well then let the curry cook for another 4 minutes or so, until it has reduced down to your preferred consistency. You can always add more base sauce or a little water if the curry becomes too dry.

To finish, season with salt, to taste, and sprinkle with the garam masala and methi leaves, if using. Stir, sprinkle with the coriander and serve.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-5599213/Spice-easy-Mango-chicken-curry.html#ixzz5G2m0OV8f
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on October 08, 2018, 12:15 AM
I was going to ask a question of Chewy Tikka here about Base Gravy but I think I've answered my own question.  I just looked back to page 2 of this thread at the Base Gravy video and then also revisited the Malai Makhoni video.  My question was going to be about the apparent "paleness" of the base gravy in the latter, but I now think it is just down to lighting. When Chewy's arm, or the tilt of the pan, causes shadow the orange colour returns.

I'm happy with the results I'm getting with my Mango Chicken now but I'm still not there 100%.  I think I'm going to need to strip the base gravy down to an extremely neutral onion base and reduce the mixed powder quantity to really allow the Mango to take over the dish.  I'm also not liking the grainy texture of the Almond flour.  Once it absorbs moisture the individual particles swell up.  This is not present in the dish I'm trying to achieve.  I'll experiment with Almond milk or perhaps even Essence.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Secret Santa on October 13, 2018, 05:30 PM
I'm also not liking the grainy texture of the Almond flour.  Once it absorbs moisture the individual particles swell up.  This is not present in the dish I'm trying to achieve.

I have the same issue with desiccated coconut. I've never experienced the grainy texture that using it gives when having a restaurant curry but people still seem to use it in their home-made curries. The mind boggles.

As far as the almond "flour" goes, that's definitely used in curries such as kormas here in the UK but I think it's more of a powder than a fine grain so doesn't "swell" in the way you're describing. Personally I'd go with the essence, or preferably extract, as you suggest - if you're sure it's even necessary for its flavour in this dish that is.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Peripatetic Phil on October 13, 2018, 09:43 PM
I have the same issue with desiccated coconut. I've never experienced the grainy texture that using it gives when having a restaurant curry ...
I have.  I really used to enjoy a "meat Ceylon" until I discovered that BIR Ceylon curries use coconut.  As soon as I knew, I was able to detect the texture of dessicated coconut, at which point I stopped enjoying (and therefore purchasing) BIR Ceylon curries.

** Phil.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: chewytikka on October 14, 2018, 09:41 PM
Hi Livo
Crikey, this quest just keeps on going.

The Almond powder is full of fat, the fat needs to melt
for it to dissolve completely. Hence BIR high heat cooking method in this recipe.

Checking your Almond (whatever)
Simple demo for you to try, Get your smallest sauce pan, add a mug of fresh milk
add 2 Tbsp of Almond powder 1 or 2 tsp of sugar. stir well, bring to the boil, three or four
times, maintaining a vigorous rolling boil for a couple of minutes or three.
Remove any skin which has formed, your left with a delicious piping hot Almond drink.

The Almond powder will have cooked and dissolved completely or 99% at a micro level.
If this demo leaves you with grains, you simply have the wrong Almond Powder. ;)

You could also treat this as a restaurant precook and use the milk in the curry along with the cream.  8)

cheers Chewy

Another thought, these days you can source processed Almond Butter, just like Peanut Butter
which is used extensively in far eastern cuisines.



Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on October 14, 2018, 11:54 PM
Once again, thanks Chewy.  I tried Almond Powder first and then bought Almond Flour but there was really very little discernible difference. Perhaps I'm not getting the heat.  I'm happy with the overall flavours of the dish now so it is only a matter of mouth feel and texture of the gravy.  I'll be giving your suggestions a go in the near future.  I have seen almond butter and cashew butter so I may just need to obtain a couple of jars.

Phil, that's a bit mind over matter if you used to enjoy something until you knew what was in it.  Reminds me of the Sunday morning my father told me what black pudding was made from.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Peripatetic Phil on October 15, 2018, 02:01 PM
Phil, that's a bit mind over matter if you used to enjoy something until you knew what was in it.  Reminds me of the Sunday morning my father told me what black pudding was made from.

You remind of being the occasion when we were served kaszanka at a conference in Poland, after five days of being served nothing but kielbasa *; most of my fellow delegates treated it with disdain (having asked what was in it), whereas I tore into it as if I hadn't eaten for five days (which was more or less the case) ...

** Phil.
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Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Secret Santa on February 10, 2019, 04:52 PM
Well I said I was going to give this a go and now I have. Verdict: truly gross!  ;D

I should preface this with the fact that I abhor korma and this is just a fancied-up korma so I really, really should not have made this in the first place. I followed chewytikkas malai makhoni video and as suggested added a good glug of mango pulp at the end. I assume that's all there is to it and I haven't left anything out?

It's nauseating. It's cloying. It's greasy. It's dreadful!  :'(

I managed to down about half of it with rice purely by eating it with lime pickle to try to get some balance and by following every mouthful with a good glug of green tea to stop me heaving.

It just amazes me that not only could people eat this regularly but also have it as their favourite - and I use the word quite wrongly - curry.

I tasted a bit of the sauce after it had cooled and it really is a dessert. In my opinion it has no place on any forum that dedicates itself to curry; BIR or otherwise.

It's my own fault. I don't like kormas. But I had to give it a go to see what all the fuss was about.  Lesson learned; step away from the kormas Santa!  :)

And what is it with mango puree (and the Mango Rubicon that I bought) that makes them greasy, like drinking oil?
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Peripatetic Phil on February 10, 2019, 04:57 PM
Well I said I was going to give this a go and now I have. Verdict: truly gross!  ;D

ROTFL :)  I shall now read on ...

Quote
And what is it with mango puree (and the Mango Rubicon that I bought) that makes them greasy, like drinking oil?

Dunno, Guv — your palate, perhaps ?  For me, neither feels/tastes greasy,  But I have to ask — did you buy Rubicon Mango, Rubicon Mango Light, or Rubicon Mango Deluxe ?  I would give house-room only to the last, of which I drink at least half a litre a day.

** Phil.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Secret Santa on February 10, 2019, 06:28 PM
did you buy Rubicon Mango, Rubicon Mango Light, or Rubicon Mango Deluxe ?

It says on the box, Rubicon Mango ... now with half the sugar!

It's the only one they had in Home Bargains. I don't know what it is but both, particularly the mango purée - which is Kesar by the way and not Alphonso as I thought - , have a very definite oily quality to them, just as if actual vegetable oil had been added. The flavour is sublime of course but the oiliness I could live without. Could be just my palate as you say but I've never experienced this sensation with any other foodstuff. Well, apart from actual vegetable oil drunk neat (yes I have!).

When I'm feeling less nauseated from the mango chicken I'll try your lassi recipe.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Peripatetic Phil on February 10, 2019, 06:47 PM
It says on the box, Rubicon Mango ... now with half the sugar!

That is exactly the problem.  I drank it (not seeing that text) and knew immediately that it was not Rubicon Mango as I always had always known it; finally found the text, tried adding the amount of sugar that they said they had removed, and it was still not sweet enough.  Ended up adding twice the amount of sugar that they had removed, and it was finally back to the original flavour.  Then, purely by chance, I found "Rubicon Mango Deluxe", ordered a dozen from Amazon at slightly less than list price, then found they had them for less than half price in Home Bargains, at which point I bought their entire stock. 

I can't say much for A G Barr, the new owners of the brand, though.  When I e-mailed them to tell them that one container was on the verge of exploding three months before its use-by date, they denied any responsibility, said it must have been damaged in transit, and offered vouchers to the value of £3 "without prejudice".  I pointed out that the point at which it had leaked (it had by now exploded) was on the base seam, which is protected in transit by a thick cardboard outer box, offered to send the package to prove the point, and received no further reply.  "Without prejudice", indeed !

Exactly the opposite with SureFlap, by the way.  Telephoned to tell them that the rotary catch was sticking, received a brand new one free of charge in the next post, and an e-mail pointing to a video to show how to take the thing apart to repair.  Well done SureFlap; A G Barr, you are crap.

** Phil.

Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on February 10, 2019, 07:02 PM
You can't say I didn't warn you SS.  ;D. You wouldn't be the first to view this dish in that way, but it is nevertheless very popular amongst those with a sweet tooth and an aversion to spices.

I don't use a mango "drink".  I use big tin cans of mango pulp. I've used both Kesar and Alphonso but it needs to be just pulped fruit. Even fresh Kensington Pride mango pulped by myself when they're in season, does not provide the flavour of tinned imported Indian grown mango.

I just read that Rubicon has 18% mango. The pulp in the tins is 94%.

This possibly won't change your opinion of the dish though SS.  I normally now just use a very mild base gravy and very mildly spiced pre-cooked chicken.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: Secret Santa on February 10, 2019, 08:59 PM
I don't use a mango "drink".

I didn't either livo, just the tinned, pure Kesar mango pulp. The Rubicon drink was only referenced because of the weird oiliness I experienced with both the purée and it.

Quote
I normally now just use a very mild base gravy and very mildly spiced pre-cooked chicken.

Same here. Kris Dhillon base and chicken thigh poached in base sauce. I intended chicken tikka but didn't get around to it. Anyway, I just have to accept that this type of dish is waaaay out of my culinary comfort zone. I still feel sick, several hours later. It's weird though because I absolutely love every individual ingredient. It's just the combination that does weird things to me.
Title: Re: Mango Chicken
Post by: livo on February 10, 2019, 09:14 PM
I understand now.  I have to say that it isn't my preferred curry but I do quite enjoy it. I also enjoy korma and other milder dishes.  If you don't, I can see why you wouldn't enjoy it.  Some establishments do describe their own version as being made with Tikka and I was once told that it was used when I asked.  Out here it is a favourite for the kids on curry night and this was where it became the search for me 20 years ago.