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Author Topic: Mango Chicken  (Read 12713 times)

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Offline livo

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Re: Mango Chicken
« Reply #30 on: February 23, 2018, 10:30 PM »
Thanks Garp, that does look good. It appears to be similar to the traditional Indian sub-continent Mango Curries that do look delicious and it is certainly on the list of dishes to try out. 

The Malai Makhoni that CT has just shown us, and then on to his Chicken Delight by the addition of mango puree, is as close as I've ever been.  I would be satisfied I'm there with some very minor modifications from the dish in my fridge right now. Perhaps the use of the Malai Tikka instead of base gravy pre-cooked chicken.  Some menu descriptions do mention Tikka, albeit not specifically Malai.  I need to further reduce the spicing or possibly use a very neutral, low spiced base and I need to examine the use of almond meal vs almond flour for the velvety smooth mouth feel.

The dish I've been looking for is really stretching the definition of the word curry. It has meat and sauce and that is about as far as it can be stretched.  This will sound very weird to people who love Chili Hot Curry but Korma people will get it.  You have to try to imagine a Mango Lassi , or creamy mango smoothy with extremely mild spicing and pre-cooked or tikka chicken.  I know it sounds odd but that is a description of the dish and why kids love it.

This is why it has been so hard to explain to people in the Curry circle what the dish is like.  It is like a desert curry.
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Offline livo

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Re: Mango Chicken
« Reply #31 on: February 26, 2018, 09:38 PM »
The most recently prepared dish received the thumbs up from number 1 daughter so I know I'm on the right track.  I've sourced a bag of Almond Flour to try in place of the Almond Meal and I've made a new batch of very mild base gravy using coconut oil and ghee in place of vegetable oil  I'll go and buy some chicken breast and some double cream today and give it another try.  It is very close to the desired dish now.

Both Almond Meal and Almond Flour are considered as Almond Powder which is confusing.  Meal is whole almonds, skin and all ground to the meal while flour is  blanched almonds which are ground to a much finer powder as used for French macaroons.  I'll see if it makes the desired difference.
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Offline livo

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Re: Mango Chicken
« Reply #32 on: March 01, 2018, 08:24 PM »
Well after my most recent attempt I have no doubt the dish is only a fingernail away. The neutral, but sweet, base gravy helped immensely. I'm not happy with the grainy texture still present,  even with the use of very fine almond flour. The individual grains swell in the cooking process and prevent the smooth gravy effect.
I've bought some uht long-life almond milk to try next time around but I may also need a different thickening agent. Perhaps roasted gram flour. I'm also going to try a cook without almonds altogether. They may not be required at all.
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Offline livo

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Re: Mango Chicken
« Reply #33 on: March 02, 2018, 11:07 PM »
The judgement is done. No 1 daughter says that she would no be able to tell this didn't come from the Restaurant / Takeaway.  I still want to fine tune a couple of little things but maybe I'm being a bit too pedantic. 

Mission accomplished. ;D
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Offline southsussex

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Re: Mango Chicken
« Reply #34 on: May 20, 2018, 01:20 PM »
Dan Toombs has just bought out a new 'Easy' curry book and this mango chicken recipe, also replicated in the Mail, features:

2tbsp rapeseed oil
2tbsp mixed garlic and ginger paste
1tbsp mixed powder
1tsp chilli powder
3tbsp finely chopped coriander stalks
2 fresh green chillies, thinly sliced
600ml (1pt) base curry sauce, warm
6tbsp coconut flour (from supermarkets)
4tbsp smooth mango chutney
700g (1lb 8oz) cooked chicken
1 small mango, cut into bite-sized chunks
Salt
1tsp garam masala
1tsp dried methi leaves
3tbsp finely chopped coriander leaves, to serve
Heat the oil in a large frying pan over a medium-high heat. Stir in the mixed garlic and ginger paste and let it fry for 30 seconds. Stir in the mixed powder and chilli powder, along with the finely chopped coriander stalks and fresh chillies.

Stir everything really well into the hot oil, then add 250ml of the base sauce. Let this come to a rolling simmer, stirring only if it is sticking to the pan. Add the coconut flour, mango chutney and 125ml of the base sauce. Stir in the chicken and heat through for 1 minute in the sauce.

Now add the mango chunks and the rest of the base sauce. Stir well then let the curry cook for another 4 minutes or so, until it has reduced down to your preferred consistency. You can always add more base sauce or a little water if the curry becomes too dry.

To finish, season with salt, to taste, and sprinkle with the garam masala and methi leaves, if using. Stir, sprinkle with the coriander and serve.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-5599213/Spice-easy-Mango-chicken-curry.html#ixzz5G2m0OV8f

Offline livo

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Re: Mango Chicken
« Reply #35 on: October 08, 2018, 12:15 AM »
I was going to ask a question of Chewy Tikka here about Base Gravy but I think I've answered my own question.  I just looked back to page 2 of this thread at the Base Gravy video and then also revisited the Malai Makhoni video.  My question was going to be about the apparent "paleness" of the base gravy in the latter, but I now think it is just down to lighting. When Chewy's arm, or the tilt of the pan, causes shadow the orange colour returns.

I'm happy with the results I'm getting with my Mango Chicken now but I'm still not there 100%.  I think I'm going to need to strip the base gravy down to an extremely neutral onion base and reduce the mixed powder quantity to really allow the Mango to take over the dish.  I'm also not liking the grainy texture of the Almond flour.  Once it absorbs moisture the individual particles swell up.  This is not present in the dish I'm trying to achieve.  I'll experiment with Almond milk or perhaps even Essence.
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Offline Secret Santa

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Re: Mango Chicken
« Reply #36 on: October 13, 2018, 05:30 PM »
I'm also not liking the grainy texture of the Almond flour.  Once it absorbs moisture the individual particles swell up.  This is not present in the dish I'm trying to achieve.

I have the same issue with desiccated coconut. I've never experienced the grainy texture that using it gives when having a restaurant curry but people still seem to use it in their home-made curries. The mind boggles.

As far as the almond "flour" goes, that's definitely used in curries such as kormas here in the UK but I think it's more of a powder than a fine grain so doesn't "swell" in the way you're describing. Personally I'd go with the essence, or preferably extract, as you suggest - if you're sure it's even necessary for its flavour in this dish that is.
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Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Mango Chicken
« Reply #37 on: October 13, 2018, 09:43 PM »
I have the same issue with desiccated coconut. I've never experienced the grainy texture that using it gives when having a restaurant curry ...
I have.  I really used to enjoy a "meat Ceylon" until I discovered that BIR Ceylon curries use coconut.  As soon as I knew, I was able to detect the texture of dessicated coconut, at which point I stopped enjoying (and therefore purchasing) BIR Ceylon curries.

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Online chewytikka

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Re: Mango Chicken
« Reply #38 on: October 14, 2018, 09:41 PM »
Hi Livo
Crikey, this quest just keeps on going.

The Almond powder is full of fat, the fat needs to melt
for it to dissolve completely. Hence BIR high heat cooking method in this recipe.

Checking your Almond (whatever)
Simple demo for you to try, Get your smallest sauce pan, add a mug of fresh milk
add 2 Tbsp of Almond powder 1 or 2 tsp of sugar. stir well, bring to the boil, three or four
times, maintaining a vigorous rolling boil for a couple of minutes or three.
Remove any skin which has formed, your left with a delicious piping hot Almond drink.

The Almond powder will have cooked and dissolved completely or 99% at a micro level.
If this demo leaves you with grains, you simply have the wrong Almond Powder. ;)

You could also treat this as a restaurant precook and use the milk in the curry along with the cream.  8)

cheers Chewy

Another thought, these days you can source processed Almond Butter, just like Peanut Butter
which is used extensively in far eastern cuisines.



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Offline livo

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Re: Mango Chicken
« Reply #39 on: October 14, 2018, 11:54 PM »
Once again, thanks Chewy.  I tried Almond Powder first and then bought Almond Flour but there was really very little discernible difference. Perhaps I'm not getting the heat.  I'm happy with the overall flavours of the dish now so it is only a matter of mouth feel and texture of the gravy.  I'll be giving your suggestions a go in the near future.  I have seen almond butter and cashew butter so I may just need to obtain a couple of jars.

Phil, that's a bit mind over matter if you used to enjoy something until you knew what was in it.  Reminds me of the Sunday morning my father told me what black pudding was made from.
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