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Author Topic: Goat Dhansak  (Read 1770 times)

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Online tempest63

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Goat Dhansak
« on: February 24, 2018, 09:31 AM »
Whilst scouring the net for goat recipes I found this particular one on a number of sites, variously described as traditional or Grandmothers Dhansak. I took to this recipe as it didn’t require a pre-made Dhansak Masala like a lot of the recipes call for.

As I have a project for this weekend that uses up all my goat meat, a trip to the butcher at Chelmsford market would be in order before next weekend and another project is born

Goat Dhansak

Dhal:
1/2 cup toor
1/4 cup chana
1/4 cup moong
1/2 cup masoor
1 small aubergine
1 cup of diced pumpkin
2 tablespoons dill
1 cup methi (fenugreek) leaves
2 tablespoons tamarind concentrate
1/2 cup jaggery (goor)
2 tablespoons coriander leaves with stalks
2 tablespoons chopped mint

wet masala:
2 inch cinnamon stick
6 cardamom pods
5 cloves
2 teaspoons cumin seeds
10 black peppercorns
1 tablespoon coriander seeds
8 dried red chilies
1 tablespoon chopped ginger
10 cloves garlic
1 cup chopped fresh coriander leaves and stalks

dry masala:
3 cardamom pods
3 cloves
2 star anise
1 teaspoon cumn seeds
8 black peppercorns
2 red chillies
2 tablespoons methi leaves

goat:
3 tablespoons oil
2 lbs cubed goat
Chopped coriander and mint to garnish

1. Wash the toor, chana,  moong and masoor then soak overnight. Drain and rinse and mix with other dhal ingredients. Add 2 cups water and boil for 30 mins. Once cooled puree in a blender.

2. Prepare wet masala by roasting everything except the fresh coriander in a pan for 3-4 mins, stir constantly, do not burn. Remove and grind in mixer with the coriander leaves and some water to make a paste.

3. Roast the dry masala spices separately and grind in a coffee grinder.

4. Heat oil and brown meat in batches on a medium high heat. Return all the browned meat to the pan and add the wet masala and cook, stirring, for 2 to 3 minutes.
Add barely enough water to just cover the goat meat and bring to a simmer, cover and simmer away for about an hour. Add the pureed dhal mixture and the dry masala, stir to combine and continue to simmer on low heat until the meat is perfectly soft; about another hour. Garnish with the chopped herbs and serve with Parsi brown rice.



Online tempest63

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Re: Goat Dhansak
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2018, 08:33 PM »
As I have a project for this weekend that uses up all my goat meat, a trip to the butcher at Chelmsford market would be in order before next weekend and another project is born

I got carried away again.
1 kilo goat, off the bone but the bones thrown in.
1.5 kilos mutton, again off the bone but with the bones chucked in.
2 kilos shin of beef on the bone (3 big thick slices with lots of visible bone-marrow)
4 large lamb shanks.
A big slab of beef dripping
T63


Offline livo

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Re: Goat Dhansak
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2018, 11:25 PM »
Some tasty cooking ahead for you.  What do you intend doing with the shin beef?  My Greek mate once did an Osso Bucco style stew with Greek influence. It was prepared in a camp oven / Dutch oven on an open fire.  It was amazing.  I often do shin beef in the slow cooker.  Really good food.
Whiskey is the answer, but what was the question?

Online tempest63

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Re: Goat Dhansak
« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2018, 06:59 AM »
Some tasty cooking ahead for you.  What do you intend doing with the shin beef?  My Greek mate once did an Osso Bucco style stew with Greek influence. It was prepared in a camp oven / Dutch oven on an open fire.  It was amazing.  I often do shin beef in the slow cooker.  Really good food.

Definitely going in the slow cooker, not sure yet if it will be a British style stew or a curry. I currently favour the first option, most likely cooking it in some ale which leads me to think it would possibly make a great Flemish carbonnade?
T63

Offline livo

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Re: Goat Dhansak
« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2018, 10:42 AM »
A good ale is critical for stew with beef. Shin beef on bone stewed in beer. Mmmmmmmmm. I remember hearing about beer in beef stew on the radio when I was driving a truck that only had am band. I thought to myself, I'll have to try that. Amazing and the beauty of a good stew is to keep it simple.
Whiskey is the answer, but what was the question?

Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Goat Dhansak
« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2018, 12:07 PM »
A good ale is critical for stew with beef. Shin beef on bone stewed in beer. Mmmmmmmmm. I remember hearing about beer in beef stew on the radio when I was driving a truck that only had am band. I thought to myself, I'll have to try that. Amazing and the beauty of a good stew is to keep it simple.
I do not dispute for one second that a good steak-and-ale pie is an excellent dish.  But is it better (or even as good as) a steak-and-kidney pie made with no ale whatsoever ?  I would suggest not.  A steak-and-kidney pie is pure perfection, and as simple as anyone could wish -- gently sauté both steak and kidney in good beef dripping, add a sufficient quantity of water and salt to taste, braise until cooked, then into a pie dish with a short-crust (or even flaky) pastry topping and into the oven for around 25 minutes.  A dish made in heaven, ranking alongside a rabbit, leek & lemon pie as one of the finest dishes ever created. Served with parsley-strewn boiled potatoes, and parsley dumplings if you are feeling exceptionally hungry.

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Offline livo

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Re: Goat Dhansak
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2018, 10:17 PM »
Definitely a case of each to their own here Pp. I can't stand the taste of kidney.

T63 did cook the dhansak?
Whiskey is the answer, but what was the question?

Online tempest63

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Re: Goat Dhansak
« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2018, 09:22 PM »
Definitely a case of each to their own here Pp. I can't stand the taste of kidney.

T63 did cook the dhansak?

The lentils are soaking as we speak. Couldn’t find pumpkin so bought a butternut squash.


Online tempest63

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Re: Goat Dhansak
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2018, 05:22 AM »
Best Dhansak I have ever knocked up. I added a couple of onions to the original recipe and browned them off after searing the meat., I also used 1.5 kilos of meat off the bone.
Knocked the pants off some of the others I have cooked, but believe me, you need a big pan for this.
T63

Offline livo

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Re: Goat Dhansak
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2018, 06:28 AM »
I watched a documentary one time years ago and I can't recall the details. Somebody here may remember it.  It was about a big open event cooking competition in India and these backyard cooks from around the country could enter and prepare their own best signature dish. They cooked them in big pots, on open fires, over primitive gas burners etc.

I'm pretty sure the old guy who ended up winning cooked either a Mutton or a Goat Dhansak. It must have been pretty good.  How much would you like to get the gig judging it?

I'm yet to try cooking a Dhansak but it is on the list.
Whiskey is the answer, but what was the question?


 


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