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Author Topic: Spicier Curry Color  (Read 1303 times)

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Offline indianbeg

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Spicier Curry Color
« on: April 04, 2018, 06:07 AM »
I'm looking to copy a masala recipe from a favorite restaurant of mine. However, I've noticed the spicier the dish gets it actually changes colors from a light yellow to fiery red. Does anyone have a clue as to what they might be using to make it spicier? I've attached pictures.

Offline london

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Re: Spicier Curry Color
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2018, 09:20 AM »
Chilli powder.
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Online livo

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Re: Spicier Curry Color
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2018, 10:42 AM »
Perhaps you could name the Restaurant and the dish you are asking about. Maybe you could explain how it is the same dish with different colouration due only to heat variation.  Perhaps you could explain the naming of your photographs.  :-\
Whiskey is the answer, but what was the question?

Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Spicier Curry Color
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2018, 11:09 AM »
I'm looking to copy a masala recipe from a favorite restaurant of mine. However, I've noticed the spicier the dish gets it actually changes colors from a light yellow to fiery red. Does anyone have a clue as to what they might be using to make it spicier? I've attached pictures.

Almost certainly ground chillies.  As a 16-year-old beginner at curry cooking, I believed that the only spice used was curry powder, and I would regularly search Brick Lane and its environs for the hottest curry powder I could find.  Eventually a kind shop owner explained to me that although there are minor variations in the strength of curry powder, it is actually ground chillies that give a curry real heat, and of course being red, the more chilli that is used, the redder the dish becomes.  But food colouring also plays a part, since tandoori chocken is not very hot yet (at least as served in the UK) it is almost invariably a very saturated red.

** Phil.
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