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Author Topic: Chicken Dahiwala by Ron Mazumdar  (Read 890 times)

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Offline tempest63

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Chicken Dahiwala by Ron Mazumdar
« on: September 29, 2018, 08:02 AM »
I bought the immigrant cookbook as a gift for a family member and found this great looking recipe. I googled it and found the recipe online where the chef discusses its origins.
I made it and it turned out very well. I made few changes to the recipe, first I replaced the water with home made chicken bone broth, I also chopped the garlic and ginger, more than the recipe calls for, and pounded it in a pestle and mortar with half the salt into a creamy paste. The salt needs to be coarse sea salt

60ml oil

15ml ginger paste or finely chopped ginger
15ml garlic paste or 3 garlic cloves chopped
2 medium onions, thinly sliced
10 ml salt
1.4kg boneless, skinless Chicken thighs in fork sized pieces
15ml tomato purée
30ml plain full fat yoghurt
Quarter cup or about 15g chopped coriander leaves

WHOLE MASALA
3 medium Indian bay leaves
Half teaspoon cumin seeds
3 cloves
1 cinnamon stick
4 green cardamom, bruised
5 whole black peppercorns

GROUND MASALA
5ml turmeric
5ml ground cumin
5ml cayenne pepper
5ml ground coriander
5ml garam masala

METHOD
In a large sauté pan heat the oil over medium heat. Add the whole masala and cook until the spices release their fragrance, 30 to 45 seconds. Add the ginger and garlic and fry until golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the onions and 2 teaspoons of salt and cook, stirring  until the onions turn golden brown.

Add the ground masala ingredients and stir for 30 seconds. Add 2 cups of water, bring to a boil, then lower the heat to medium-low and simmer until the source thickens, 8 to 10 minutes.

Add the chicken, return the heat to medium, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until it is about three-quarters cooked, 10 to 15 minutes. Stir in the tomato purée, and simmer until the chicken has cooked completely, 8 to 10 minutes.

 In a small bowl, whisk the yoghurt thoroughly. Just before serving, gradually mix the yoghurt into the curry, stirring slowly. Cook for an additional five minutes or so to heat through, without letting it come to a boil. Taste, add salt if needed, and remove from the heat.

 Sprinkle with chopped coriander and serve.

Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Chicken Dahiwala by Ron Mazumdar
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2018, 10:48 AM »
The salt needs to be coarse sea salt
These days I tend to use Himalayan pink ("black") salt for such purposes; do you think it would work here ?
** Phil.
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Offline tempest63

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Re: Chicken Dahiwala by Ron Mazumdar
« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2018, 09:04 PM »
The salt needs to be coarse sea salt
These days I tend to use Himalayan pink ("black") salt for such purposes; do you think it would work here ?
** Phil.

I reckon it would. I haven’t bought Black salt in years. Maldon sea salt is about the most exotic I have in the cupboard.

T63

Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Chicken Dahiwala by Ron Mazumdar
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2018, 10:08 PM »
Ah well, my maternal lineage were born in Maldon, and my paternal lineage retired there, so Maldon salt isn't exotic enough for us !
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Online livo

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Re: Chicken Dahiwala by Ron Mazumdar
« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2018, 10:02 PM »
Looks like a good feed.
Phil, forgive me if I'm wrong but I have both Himalayan pink salt and black salt (which is also pink in colour) and they are not the same.  Pink salt tastes like salt whereas Black salt is sulphurous in aroma and tastes slightly of boiled egg. As far as I know they are not the same thing.
Whiskey is the answer, but what was the question?

Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Chicken Dahiwala by Ron Mazumdar
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2018, 10:11 PM »
Looks like a good feed.
Phil, forgive me if I'm wrong but I have both Himalayan pink salt and black salt (which is also pink in colour) and they are not the same.  Pink salt tastes like salt whereas Black salt is sulphurous in aroma and tastes slightly of boiled egg. As far as I know they are not the same thing.
Ah, interesting — in that case I should probably order some black salt, because it is the sulphurous aroma that I am seeking for chat dishes.
Thank you !
** Phil.
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Online livo

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Re: Chicken Dahiwala by Ron Mazumdar
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2018, 03:12 AM »
AKA Kala Namak.

Found this: https://www.himalayansaltfactory.com.au/about-himalayan-salt/different-colours-of-himalayan-salt/
PINK Himalayan Crystal Mineral Salt; which is what Himalayan Crystal Salt is more commonly known as. Pink Himalayan Salt is pink in colour with tinges of both white and red.

RED Himalayan Crystal Mineral Salt; the dark red and the orange colours in the red Himalayan Salt is due to higher iron content.

BLACK Himalayan Crystal Mineral Salt; also known as ‘Kala Namak’ is not actually black, but more of a reddish-grey. Black Himalayan Salt is a complex mineral compound with a very strong sulphur content and taste. To eat; the flavour hits quickly but then it dissipates to leave a rich mineral taste. Black Himalayan Salt is often used in authentic Indian cooking.
Whiskey is the answer, but what was the question?

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Re: Chicken Dahiwala by Ron Mazumdar
« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2018, 12:24 AM »
Thank you Livo — Kala Namak I shall seek out.
** Phil.
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Offline Bing

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Re: Chicken Dahiwala by Ron Mazumdar
« Reply #8 on: October 06, 2018, 09:43 AM »
Himalayan pink Salt can be found in Poundland UK..

Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Chicken Dahiwala by Ron Mazumdar
« Reply #9 on: October 06, 2018, 03:47 PM »
Himalayan pink Salt can be found in Poundland UK..

Thanks, Bing.  I purchased mine from B&M but I suspect it is the same.  What it is not is Kala Namak, which I have now ordered from Amazon (post-free) at a very reasonable price.

** Phil.
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