• September 22, 2019, 10:06 PM
Welcome, guest! Please login or register.
collapse

* RGBD

Author Topic: For the Love of Oil  (Read 393 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Bob-A-Job

  • Head Chef
  • ***
  • Posts: 122
    • View Profile
For the Love of Oil
« on: January 03, 2019, 01:32 AM »
What is the reason for the love of Oil that seems prevalent in the majority of recipes?  Personally I don't like it, hence my question.

BIR also make Keema (ground lamb/mutton) which is quite dry.
Karahi (asian style) is almost without oil

TA's (at least a dozen that I have tried within deliver of my address) have to maximise profit and so tend to provide mostly 'gravy' with some tomato and onions/pepper and a little meat, swimming in oil. unless I specify Asian Style.

The best I ever had was as reward for working in a video shop, in the late 80's. Quail with fresh orange and chappati and had only a little gravy.

Are we in love with personal tradition, flavour or expectation?

Just a thought.  Discuss.
If you can learn something new and have a laugh, the day has not been wasted.

Offline CarpCarp

  • Trainee Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 47
    • View Profile
Re: For the Love of Oil
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2019, 05:02 AM »
Indian cookery needs oil/butter to produce the required results regarding fryof Spice, Paste ,Garlc and Tarka. You also have the additional oils released from meats full of protein, vitamins. Don’t be fooled into thinking your Indian curry has little oil just because it’s not visible. TA/Restaurant have techniques to hide it well, in the same way oven cooking of Fish and Chips would lack in flavour with comparison to fried Fish and Chips again lots more oil than curry. Large amounts of oil,butter,cream than you could ever imagine in your British food Restaurant meals or supermarkets readymade meals, pizza so on. Thanks.


Online Peripatetic Phil

  • CONTRIBUTING MEMBER
  • Jedi Curry Master
  • **********
  • Posts: 6922
  • Caution: some posts may annoy the anally retentive
    • View Profile
    • The Westberry Hotel / Hoi-An Restaurant
Re: For the Love of Oil
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2019, 01:55 PM »
What is the reason for the love of Oil that seems prevalent in the majority of recipes?  Personally I don't like it, hence my question.  [..] Are we in love with personal tradition, flavour or expectation?  Just a thought.  Discuss.

I think that there are multiple factors involved here, of which the most significant is that oils are the carriers of the flavours contained in the spices.  These spices contain so-called "essential oils", which are the flavour-carrying components, and these essential oils are, by definition, lipophilic rather than lipophobic.  Thus they bind with other oils (such as the oils with which we started our curries) and give up some of their flavours to them; on the other hand, they are hydrophobic rather than hydrophilic, so don't bind with the aqueous elements and therefore don't give up their flavours to them.  So in summary, the very flavours which we are seeking become bound to the oils in which we cook.

The second factor is appearance — to me, a curry with a clear sheen of oil on and surrounding it looks attractive; the absence of visible oil is usually (but not always, of course) a sign of a badly-cooked curry.

Finally, when cooking a curry, one is always advised to "cook until the oil comes out"; omit this step, and the curry will not have finished cooking, and therefore will not be as good as it might otherwise have been had it been finished properly.

My EUR 0,02.
** Phil.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2019, 04:37 PM by Peripatetic Phil »
Ogham's law :  The intellectual content of any message typically varies as the reciprocal of the number of emoticons that it contains..

Offline CarpCarp

  • Trainee Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 47
    • View Profile
Re: For the Love of Oil
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2019, 07:17 PM »
What is the reason for the love of Oil that seems prevalent in the majority of recipes?  Personally I don't like it, hence my question.  [..] Are we in love with personal tradition, flavour or expectation?  Just a thought.  Discuss.



The second factor is appearance — to me, a curry with a clear sheen of oil on and surrounding it looks attractive; the absence of visible oil is usually (but not always, of course) a sign of a badly-cooked curry.

Finally, when cooking a curry, one is always advised to "cook until the oil comes out"; omit this step, and the curry will not have finished cooking, and therefore will not be as good as it might otherwise have been had it been finished properly.

My EUR 0,02.
** Phil.

Phil your explanation on Oil/ButterGhee is described perfectly, covering everything I intended to point out through my horribly translated response.

Bob a job let’s hope you can really discover and learn to enjoy the depth of flavour achievable with Oil/Ghee. Best wishes.


 



You may like these posts on curry-recipes.co.uk: