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Author Topic: Cooking Potatoes  (Read 171 times)

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Online mickyp

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Cooking Potatoes
« on: March 05, 2019, 02:16 PM »
Until recently when boiling potatoes for roasts, mash, /whatever we took them out and did the next stage, a new discovery for us is leave them for 15/20 mins to dry off, the end product is so much better, if you haven't already done so, give it a whirl.

Offline Naga

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Re: Cooking Potatoes
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2019, 08:07 AM »
If I'm making roast potatoes, I bring them to boil in a pot of salted water then simmer for 6 minutes. I drain them in a colander, and, like you, allow them to dry.

Then, I heat a little sunflower oil in a roasting pan on the hob over a high flame. I rumble the potatoes around in the colander to roughen up the surfaces and briefly fry them in the hot oil, turning frequently, until the potatoes turn golden and slightly crisp on the outside.

Then, the roasting pan goes into the oven, pre-heated to 180C/Gas Mark 4, for 40 minutes. The roasties come out nicely browned, crisp on the outside and moist and tender inside.


Offline JonG

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Re: Cooking Potatoes
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2019, 08:26 AM »
Interesting Naga, I will have to try your method which is different in a couple of ways to what I usually do. Not that I am unhappy with my results, but it’s always good to experiment. 

FWIW my approach would be to bring the pots to a boil on the hob (starting with pots in cold water) , simmer ten whole mins then drain (reserve the water for gravy).  Next, without drying them, lid on and a good shake to roughen. Then add dripping and a squirt of veg oil, plus generous salt and pepper to the saucepan. 

Wait for the dripping to melt, then stir and turn out into an oversized roasting dish (important that hot air can get around them, not all squashed together in a small dish).  The saucepan residue (potato mush) gets scraped out and smeared onto the tops of the pots (future “crispy bits”)

Finally, big difference on cooking time and temp - Roast fan 150C for 90 mins, turning every 30 mins.   During this time they will develop a deep, but pale crust and will have time to get fully softened interiors.  Most roast potato recipes I see have people in far too much of a hurry to cook them at too high temps for too short a time, IMHO.  I’ve found that patience is rewarded with much better results.

However I am interested to know what your frying stage adds and will try it just as you’ve written.  One factor which makes a huge difference is the type of potato. For good results they must be floury and mid season (Nov to May). Early season and late season spuds always make disappointing roasties.

Offline JonG

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Re: Cooking Potatoes
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2019, 08:27 AM »
Until recently when boiling potatoes for roasts, mash, /whatever we took them out and did the next stage, a new discovery for us is leave them for 15/20 mins to dry off, the end product is so much better, if you haven't already done so, give it a whirl.

Hi Micky, I didn’t understand your post, sorry. Are you saying that mashed potato is better if the pots are allowed to dry for fifteen mins before you mash them?  Would they not end up a bit cool, especially as you’re then going to be adding cold milk and butter? Or do you reheat your mash in the microwave when finished ?

Online mickyp

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Re: Cooking Potatoes
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2019, 08:35 AM »
Until recently when boiling potatoes for roasts, mash, /whatever we took them out and did the next stage, a new discovery for us is leave them for 15/20 mins to dry off, the end product is so much better, if you haven't already done so, give it a whirl.

Hi Micky, I didn’t understand your post, sorry. Are you saying that mashed potato is better if the pots are allowed to dry for fifteen mins before you mash them?  Would they not end up a bit cool, especially as you’re then going to be adding cold milk and butter? Or do you reheat your mash in the microwave when finished ?

Sorry if i didnt make it clear, yep let them steam off then mash in the way you normally do it, and yes we do use the microwave to reheat before serving ;)

Offline JonG

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Re: Cooking Potatoes
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2019, 08:37 AM »
Ok thanks, I’ll give it a try.

Online mickyp

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Re: Cooking Potatoes
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2019, 09:09 AM »
If I'm making roast potatoes, I bring them to boil in a pot of salted water then simmer for 6 minutes. I drain them in a colander, and, like you, allow them to dry.

Then, I heat a little sunflower oil in a roasting pan on the hob over a high flame. I rumble the potatoes around in the colander to roughen up the surfaces and briefly fry them in the hot oil, turning frequently, until the potatoes turn golden and slightly crisp on the outside.

Then, the roasting pan goes into the oven, pre-heated to 180C/Gas Mark 4, for 40 minutes. The roasties come out nicely browned, crisp on the outside and moist and tender inside.

We did them the other week in Goosefat, tis a sin worth trying, very yummy

Offline Naga

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Re: Cooking Potatoes
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2019, 09:14 AM »
However I am interested to know what your frying stage adds and will try it just as you’ve written.  One factor which makes a huge difference is the type of potato. For good results they must be floury and mid season (Nov to May). Early season and late season spuds always make disappointing roasties.

Aye, floury potatoes, definitely - Maris Piper, King Edwards etc.

Interestingly (for me anyway!), the French seem to roast (and pan-fry) small waxy or salad potatoes (Amandine, Charlotte etc.) in their skin, either whole or parmentier, rather than floury potatoes. Different vibe, firmer flesh, but still delicious!

Dripping, goose fat and duck fat open up a whole new world of taste too!

Online chewytikka

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Re: Cooking Potatoes
« Reply #8 on: March 06, 2019, 10:30 AM »
Burn those spices "Singefry" and Bhunao are the keys to success.
Smoking Mustard Oil is good for You and your curries.....Lol


 


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