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Author Topic: 70's Curry  (Read 1174 times)

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Offline mickyp

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70's Curry
« on: March 22, 2019, 08:32 PM »
During the 70's going for a curry after a fruitless visit to a Disco was a common thing, something to soak up the lager we had already had, and help heal the dismay caused by the failing to "pull".

My memories of these were of them being superb, we usually only went to one curry house, and never seemed to veer from Popadoms, Chicken Tikka, Meat Madras, with two chapati's, pilau rice and an mushroom bhaji.

Now was it better or are my memories clouded by all the lager.

Online chewytikka

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Re: 70's Curry
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2019, 09:08 PM »
At least your posting about something curry related :D well done

Chicken Tikka in the 70s, suprised, must have been the end of the 70s

Can you not remember the actual restaurant, town etc...
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Offline mickyp

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Re: 70's Curry
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2019, 10:47 PM »
At least your posting about something curry related :D well done

Chicken Tikka in the 70s, suprised, must have been the end of the 70s

Can you not remember the actual restaurant, town etc...

The Bangladesh London Road South Croydon.  Its an Estate Agents now.

Online livo

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Re: 70's Curry
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2019, 05:29 AM »
No curry houses out here at that time.  Late night hamburgers, bacon and egg rolls, hot potato chips etc were commonly available across the road from the pub.  Of course the proprietors / workers there often had there hands full. The queues used to be quite long and lager induced impatience often didn't blend well. They were certainly busy and made good money for putting in the effort I suppose.  Our local was affectionately known as Greasy Ray's. Ray and his charming wife, Maria, cooked excellent burgers and she was a very strong and determined lady.  I still admire her ability to single-handedly control a large group of drunken yobbos simply using the threat of no food for bad behaviour.

There was only 1 Doner kebab trailer in the whole area at the time and it was too far away for most weekends. Another favourite was the Hotdog man with his trolley.  These guys used to occasionally show up at closing time until Health and Safety put an end to them. Belly full of beer, a long bread roll, a long skinny frankfurt (sometimes even warm) served with a choice of sauces and mustards or even mushy peas.  These tasty treats were often not carried very well by some already overindulged patrons who mistakenly thought they needed something to eat.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2019, 11:31 PM by livo »
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Online Ghoulie

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Re: 70's Curry
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2019, 06:17 PM »
My intro curries was in the early 60s.  Brilliant Indian run by an ex Gurkha in Altrincham called The Taj on Church St.  Fantastic madras prawn or chicken.  Not really tasted anyhting like the madras from there since.  There was a good Indian on Princess St Manchester around same period called Taj Mahal.  Madras in their was pretty hot.  Vindaloo too much so.  They also did a Phaal - but no one ever dared try it - the waiter would put you off ordering it.  My mare Pete asked for a Phaal chicken once - ate it - I tasted it - too much for me.  When he’d finished, the boss came over and asked how he liked it.  Fantastic Pete said.  Boss then told him ‘ Bloody good job we didn’t give you the Phaal, sir - that was the vindaloo !’
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Offline mickyp

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Re: 70's Curry
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2019, 06:44 PM »
My intro curries was in the early 60s.  Brilliant Indian run by an ex Gurkha in Altrincham called The Taj on Church St.  Fantastic madras prawn or chicken.  Not really tasted anyhting like the madras from there since.  There was a good Indian on Princess St Manchester around same period called Taj Mahal.  Madras in their was pretty hot.  Vindaloo too much so.  They also did a Phaal - but no one ever dared try it - the waiter would put you off ordering it.  My mare Pete asked for a Phaal chicken once - ate it - I tasted it - too much for me.  When he’d finished, the boss came over and asked how he liked it.  Fantastic Pete said.  Boss then told him ‘ Bloody good job we didn’t give you the Phaal, sir - that was the vindaloo !’

I remember one night in my local curry house some lads fuelled on lager came in, during the order one lad who insisted the waiter's name was "Abdel" said "make sure its hot",........they did, watching him eating it was bloody good entertainment

Offline tempest63

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Re: 70's Curry
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2019, 05:10 PM »
My first 70’s curry was Vesta boil in the bag. My first restaurant curry was in Portsmouth in the early 80’s. My first “proper” curry was in Oman in 1986 on a large construction project when the Indian guys invited.me to their mess to try the curry of the day.

Offline curryhell

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Re: 70's Curry
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2019, 09:46 PM »
My first 70’s curry was Vesta boil in the bag
.
Those were the days.  I remember them well, normally accompanied by Uncle Ben's boil in the bag rice.  Supposedly the nearest thing you could get to an Indian curry.  Fortunately, times have moved on and even the newest to the BIR journey are able to create far superior offering using the info on this site.  My first restaurant experience was early 70's in Blackpool of all places.  All I can remember was that it was different to anything I'd previously experienced and a bit on the spicy side compared to any curry I'd eaten until that point.  Also from the 70's, does anybody remember the cans of chicken curry from M&S back in the day?  Nothing like we're used to now days, but a reasonable tasting curry flavour superior to Vesta and the tin was just packed full of chicken.  Happy days but a far cry from the many superior options we have nowadays, albeit we can't seem to get the "great" flavours of the 80's for some.. 
So singe baby singe, the curry's getting better ..........

Offline One Keema Naan

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Re: 70's Curry
« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2019, 08:24 PM »
70s a bit before my time for curry eating lads, sorry!   
I grew up in Belfast, which for reasons that shouldn't need explaining was lacking in social amenities. I do remember getting Chinese in the early Eighties when my mum took me out for things like school shopping, We'd get the "businessman's lunch" which included such wonders as a starter which was the syrup from a tin of pineapple chunks with  a drop of food colouring in it!   Exotic.

I know I had my first Indian meal in Cambridge in about '84 when at camp with the ATC. A fixed menu, I only remember the main which was a (hot) Keema with a side of pakora/bahjee. 

I also remember my girlfriend's dad taking me to a "the kebab house" around '86 (I was 16/17), it was a tiny kebaberie, with bar type seating. I thought it was incredibly sophisticated - really! 

Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: 70's Curry
« Reply #9 on: March 31, 2019, 08:42 PM »
I also remember my girlfriend's dad taking me to a "the kebab house" around '86 (I was 16/17), it was a tiny kebaberie, with bar type seating. I thought it was incredibly sophisticated - really!

Always a good move to let your girlfriend's dad believe that you find his choice of restaurant sophisticated —should help to ensure that the path to true love runs smoothly thereafter, at least as far as his input is concerned !

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