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Author Topic: Roasting coffee  (Read 397 times)

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Offline Peripatetic Phil

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Roasting coffee
« on: August 19, 2019, 10:38 AM »
Does anyone here roast their own coffee ?  I ask because I have had two very bad batches of Monsooned Malabar delivered recently, the first completely lacking in aroma and the second only a little better, but I discovered that if I re-roasted the second batch there was a marked improvement in both aroma and flavour.  Both batches were medium roast at best, but to my mind Monsooned Malabar requires a dark roast to bring out its unique flavour.  Anyhow, the point of the question is — if you do roast your own coffee, how do you do it ?  I have been using my copper-bottomed stainless steel  24cm frying pan with a wooden spatula to keep the beans in motion, but the results are by no means perfect (too much variation in colour) and I wondered if anyone had experimented with (or even uses on a regular basis) the fairly modestly priced drum roasters that are available for home use.

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Offline vinotinto

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Re: Roasting coffee
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2019, 01:30 PM »
I drink the same coffee - do you get it from Coffee Direct?  I haven't noticed any difference although might be interesting to experiment with some additional roasting.


Offline Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Roasting coffee
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2019, 01:43 PM »
I used to get it from Waitrose, then when it disappeared from their stock list I switched to Coffee Direct and then Redber — all three were/are excellent.  Then, being a cheapskate at heart, I tried Rave (absolutely awful — I gave it a 1-star rating, and entitled my Amazon review "Rave off"), then went even cheaper and tried QuickSafe / Roast Batch which turned out to be slightly better (a 2-star rating, and the one I am currently re-roasting).  I have yet to try Booths or Good Life (the latter is very expensive).

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Offline vinotinto

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Re: Roasting coffee
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2019, 08:47 AM »
Thanks Phil - I'll have a look at those other suppliers (the better ones) - I do spend quite a but on the coffee...

Offline Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Roasting coffee
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2019, 09:38 AM »
Just received a private message from the more recent (and cheaper) of the two coffee vendors about whose products I left negative reviews, which I am sure he will not mind my sharing here :

Quote
Dear Philip,
Thank you for buying my coffee :) I just read your in-depth review and thanks for providing your thoughts on the coffee.  I do roast Indian beans light medium and I do accept that I can go darker on these beans but lately most customer ask for light roast.  Would you like me to send you darker roast of these beans? If you are happy than I can list a darker version of Indian Mansoon to Amazon.

Thanks again, and best wishes
Caner
« Last Edit: August 20, 2019, 12:46 PM by Peripatetic Phil »
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Offline vinotinto

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Re: Roasting coffee
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2019, 01:15 PM »
Good that they will roast how you want - I had never realised that was an option. 

Offline Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Roasting coffee
« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2019, 01:40 PM »
I very much suspect that with major online vendors such as Coffee Direct it is not; but Roast Batch / QuickSafe is obviously much smaller, and perhaps better placed to respond to customer demands.  Certainly when I used to buy my beans in the High Street (Importers Ltd., Bromley; Twinings in the Strand/Fleet Street), it was possible to ask for a custom roast but only if you were willing to purchase one complete drum-roast batch.  Perhaps Roast Batch / QuickSafe use smaller drums, or even different technology.

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Online mickdabass

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Re: Roasting coffee
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2019, 05:33 PM »
I love a good cup of coffee too. Monsooned Malabar is my fave as well. I use waitrose when im passing by. Last time I was in there I bought some MM - about 3 weeks ago. Bought some off Redber not long ago and that was good, also tried some Old Brown Java and I must admit I prefer it to MM but a t£21.75 a kilo which lasts me 2 weeks its not a cheap pastime.

I know this sounds crazy and I know Im going to get some stick over this  but would one of those air fryer gadget things be any good at batch roasting coffee?

I dont even know how they work so I should probably keep my mouth shut!!

Regards

Mick

Offline Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Roasting coffee
« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2019, 07:15 PM »
Might be possible — they are on "special offer" in Lidl at the moment, but no way of seeing what maximum temperature they can reach ...  OK, now found the answer online :

Quote
The fully adjustable temperature control allows you to pre-set the best cooking temperature for your food up to 200 degrees.

Not really hot enough for the medium-to-dark roast that I prefer :

Quote
Medium-Dark Roasts — the beans are roasted to the beginning or middle of the second crack — about 225°C (437°F) or 230°C (446°F). The flavors and aromas of the roasting process become noticeable, and the taste of the coffee may be somewhat spicy.

** Phil.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2019, 08:10 PM by Peripatetic Phil »
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Offline Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Roasting coffee
« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2019, 01:10 PM »
A quick update.  I have now "roasted" (pan fried, without oil) all the remaining beans from my recent Roast Batch / QuickSafe order. and the results have proved very successful indeed — far far better than anticipated.  I turn the hob onto "high" (5, on a scale of 1 to 5), put my copper-bottomed stainless steel 24cm pan on the hob, wait for it to come up to temperature, add a layer of beans (maybe 3/8" thick — more than a single layer, not more than three layers), and keep the beans in almost continuous motion using a wooden spatula and an occasional shake.  When the beans are reaching second crack, I turn off the stove but continue keeping the beans in motion until much of the heat has dissipated.  I leave the beans in the pan to cool, then pour them into a shallow aluminium steamer (circular, with many small circular holes in the base and three domed feet) and leave that in a warm dry place for at least 12 hours.  After that I decant the beans into an airtight container and grind when needed.  In my experience, grinding too soon can be a mistake (there can be a burnt flavour to the coffee), but what is becoming increasingly clear is that the amount of air trapped in the ground coffee which manifests itself when the boiling water is poured on is a very good indication of the freshness of the roast.  The longer the beans are left after roasting before grinding, the less air will remain trapped, so this can also be a good test of commercially roast and/or roast and ground beans — little or no trapped air, and the coffee is possibly past its best.

** Phil.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2019, 08:54 PM by Peripatetic Phil »
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