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Author Topic: Masaledar sauce?  (Read 11224 times)

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Offline Unclefrank

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Re: Masaledar sauce?
« Reply #20 on: April 16, 2012, 10:05 PM »
Hi UF
Just whisk it up, like a marinade and keep it in the fridge
It'll last a couple of weeks
A must for restaurant Jhal Frezi, Shaslik, CTM etc... ;)
cheers Chewy

Cheers Chewy
KING 810

Offline EuanW

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Re: Masaledar sauce?
« Reply #21 on: July 11, 2017, 03:15 PM »
Nice to finally find a thread on this curry, there seems to be nothing anywhere on the internet. Anyways, I'm Glaswegian and very much into my cooking . My favourite Indian restaurant serves a Masaladar curry, and its pretty much my favourite one. Have made quite a few curries in my time, but this one has become a bit of a holy grail in trying to find a recipe for it.

Is the Jalfrezi with the Jhal mix added, the closest that has been found so far ? Any help would be appreciated. Added a pic for info

Described in the restaurant as 'A mouthwatering dish made with frshly ground Punjabi spices and green peppers, cooked in a slightly tangy sauce'



Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Masaledar sauce?
« Reply #22 on: July 11, 2017, 07:10 PM »
Just to clarify, this is the "Artist Paul" recipe to which I originally referred :
Title: RAAN MASALEDAR - WHOLE LEG OF LAMB IN A SPICY
 Categories: Meats, Main dish, Indian, Lamb
      Yield: 6 servings
 
      5 lb Lamb, leg of
-----------------------------------SAUCE-----------------------------------
      2 oz Almonds, blanched
    1/2 lb Onions, coarsely chopped
      8    Garlic cloves, peeled
      4    Cubes ginger, 1", peeled. chopped coarsely
      4    Green chillies, chopped
     20 fl Yoghurt, plain
      2 tb Cumin seed, ground
      4 ts Coriander seed, ground
    1/2 ts Cayenne pepper
  3 1/2 ts Salt
    1/2 ts Garam masala
      6 tb Vegetable oil
    1/2 ts Whole cloves
     16    Cardamom pods
      1    Cinnamon stick, 2" long
     10    Peppercorns, black
----------------------------------GARNISH----------------------------------
      4 tb Sultana raisins
    1/2 oz Almonds, blanched, slivered
 
  Make sure that all the fat has been trimmed from the outside of the leg and that most of the fell (parchment-like white skin) has been pulled off.
  Put the leg in a baking dish made, preferably, of pyrex or stainless steel.
  Put the 2 oz. almonds, onions, garlic, ginger, green chillies, and 3  tablespoons of the yoghurt into the container of a food processor or  blender
  and blend until you have a paste.
  Put the remaining yoghurt into a bowl. 
  Beat lightly with a fork or a whisk until it is smooth and creamy.
  Add the paste from the processor, the cumin, coriander, cayenne, salt and garam masala.
  Mix.
  Push some of the spice paste into all the openings in the lamb.
  Be quite generous. (I forgot to say, you need to ask the butcher to make a deep pocket to hold a "stuffing", in this case, some spice paste mixture, or make a  pocket yourself) 
  Spread the paste evenly on the underside of the leg (the side that originally had less fat).
  Now, using a small, sharp, pointed knife make deep slashes in the meat, and push in the spice paste with your fingers.
  Turn the leg over so its outer side (the side that was once covered with fat) is on the top.
  Spread a very thick layer of paste over it.
  Again, make deep slashes with the knife and push the spice paste into the slashes.
  Pour all the remaining spice paste over and around the meat. 
  Cover with plastic cling film and refrigerate for 24 hours.
  Take the baking dish with the meat out of the refrigerator and let the meat come to room temperature.
  Remove the cling film.
  Heat the oil in a small frying pan over a medium flame.
  When hot, put in the cloves, cardamom, cinnamon and peppercorns.
  When the cloves swell - this takes just a few seconds - pour the hot oil and spices over the leg of  lamb. (My note: I found the spices jumped and spat in the oil quite a lot - make sure your arms and counter are well protected)
  Preheat the oven gas  mark  6, 400 F.
  Cover the baking dish tightly either with its own lid or with a large piece of aluminium foil.
  Bake, covered, for 1 hour 30 minutes.
  Remove  the foil and bake uncovered for 45 minutes.
  Baste 3-4 times with the sauce during this period.
  Scatter, or arrange in a pattern, the sultanas and the 1/2 oz. almonds over the top of the leg and bake for another 5-6 minutes.
  Remove the baking dish from the oven and let it sit in a warm place for 15 minutes.
  Take the leg out of the pan and set it on a warm platter.
  Spoon off all the fat from the top of the sauce.
  Use a slotted spoon and fish out all the whole spice in the sauce.
  Discard the spices.
  Pour the sauce around the leg.
  My Notes: I served the sauce separately, in a gravy boat. It is delicious!
** Phil.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2017, 10:16 PM by Peripatetic Phil »
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Offline EuanW

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Re: Masaledar sauce?
« Reply #23 on: July 12, 2017, 05:02 PM »
Hi Phil, thanks for the reply. I checked that recipe out before posting and can only conclude that it isn't really the same thing, judging by the ingredients.

Thanks for the reply though !

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Re: Masaledar sauce?
« Reply #24 on: July 12, 2017, 05:46 PM »
Ah well, if you search back in the original thread you will find other suggestions, and there are many to be found on the web, especially if you widen your search to include all of {masaledar, masaladar, masala dar}.

** Phil.

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Offline EuanW

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Re: Masaledar sauce?
« Reply #25 on: July 12, 2017, 11:26 PM »
The original thread ? Is there another thread regarding Masaladar, or do you just mean this thread ? Yeah I had a thorough look through this thread. The closest thing I saw, and that was purely from visual aesthetics from the video that was supplied, was the Jalfrezi that is mentioned that adds the Jhal/red masala mix. I'm not sure if thats just a straight up Jalfrezi though.

Alas, as previously stated, my fairly intensive internet searching has yielded no discernable results apart from finding this thread. Anything that comes up on internet searches looks a lot drier and completely different.

Perhaps its time to just start experimenting on my own and trying to replicate, just wish I had put as many hours into honing curries as I have with my various chilli's, maybe then I'd stand a better chance.

Once again, thanks for your reply.

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Re: Masaledar sauce?
« Reply #26 on: July 13, 2017, 10:08 AM »
The original thread ? Is there another thread regarding Masaladar, or do you just mean this thread ?
Sorry for the confusion.  I mean this thread as opposed to Artist Paul's thread.

Quote
Alas, as previously stated, my fairly intensive internet searching has yielded no discernable results apart from finding this thread. Anything that comes up on internet searches looks a lot drier and completely different.
OK, understood.

Quote
Perhaps its time to just start experimenting on my own and trying to replicate, just wish I had put as many hours into honing curries as I have with my various chilli's, maybe then I'd stand a better chance.
There's still time to start :)

** Phil.
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Online Garp

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Re: Masaledar sauce?
« Reply #27 on: July 13, 2017, 05:16 PM »

Alas, as previously stated, my fairly intensive internet searching has yielded no discernable results apart from finding this thread. Anything that comes up on internet searches looks a lot drier and completely different.


I thought the pic of the dish looked quite dry anyway Euan. As a fellow Scot, more disposed to Punjabi curries than Bangladeshi, I doubt if the Jalfrezi/Jhal route is going to lead to success.

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Re: Masaledar sauce?
« Reply #28 on: July 13, 2017, 07:13 PM »
I thought the pic of the dish looked quite dry anyway Euan. As a fellow Scot, more disposed to Punjabi curries than Bangladeshi, I doubt if the Jalfrezi/Jhal route is going to lead to success.
I would not call it "quite dry", Garp.  "Quite dry" is how I would describe my 1970's lunchtime Chicken Bhuna, which had no trace of the rich glazed sauce that I see in the photograph above.  Incidentally, I would eat that bhuna with chapati, and they did not get wet, whereas with the dish pictured I am reasonably confident that they would.

** Phil.
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Online Garp

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Re: Masaledar sauce?
« Reply #29 on: July 13, 2017, 08:51 PM »
Well it's all subjective Phil. To me that is quite dry as I like normally have lots of sauce to dip bread into.

I agree it is a 'rich glazed sauce', but it looks like a thick clingy sauce and lacking in 'naan dippiness'.


 



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