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Curry Chat => Lets Talk Curry => Topic started by: tempest63 on February 08, 2019, 09:22 PM

Title: Growing time disappointment
Post by: tempest63 on February 08, 2019, 09:22 PM
It’s that time of the year when I start to think about starting off some chillis from seed. I have an 11x6 foot bed going spare at the allotment so went looking for a few of the less common seeds to pack it out with. Logged onto the Dorset Chilli website and saw that everyone else must have had the same idea...whole range sold out. I felt like Old mother Hubbard!

Back to the garden centre then for the usual suspects

https://www.dorsetchillishop.co.uk/category/seeds-and-growing-kits
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: livo on February 08, 2019, 10:42 PM
We've have had a remarkably hot and humid summer with higher than average rainfall this year. My little chilli bush has grown and extra 18" in height over the last month alone and is absolutely covered in red chillis with ample green ones as well.  They are very hot little things but I'm not sure exactly what variety.  I noticed the other day that my father's is even better than mine. We are fortunate enough to have temperate weather allowing for these plants to easily survive over the winter.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Bob-A-Job on February 08, 2019, 11:14 PM
Indeed it is that time and I have also been considering for the last 2 weeks, which plants to grow this year (in 12" high pots, on a south facing windowsill, behind double glazing), if only I had a greenhouse, or a poly tunnel, or couple of acres...

I have my regular 'go to' favourites (Pictured below), which I have bought in places such as supermarkets, DIY stores and garden centres.

When I am deciding which to grow, it is about what do I intend to use them for, what am I cooking, how many do I want, what heat factor and what will the wife find most pleasing to look at - I still have not decided, I have a week or two more before it gets too late I think.

- The 'Paper Lantern' are hot-ish and defintely should not be harvested until the skin begins to shrivel, plants last 8 months.
- The 'Pinocchio's Nose' never get chance to ripen to red and I can eat them fresh from the plant, plants will last 12 months but even with feeding, fruit will reduce in size.
- The Patio 'Super Chilli' are abundant, quite hot once red and colourful for in the window (brownie points), plants will last 12-14 months.
- I have never had any luck with the Fresno but I have grown the Red Cherry.  Very slow growers (2 crops per season), very low yield with 7-8 fruit at a time (usually have to grow 3-4 plants at once, takes up the whole window, no brownie points) but they are hot and when sliced fresh from the plant, they will stain anything, gloves are strongly suggested.  With a little care, replanting in fresh soil during the winter and feeding during the rest of the year, I have grown these plants for 2-3 years (definitely no brownie points).

Hopefully will give some suggestions.

(http://www.curry-recipes.co.uk/imagehost/pics/ca71bbdcbb3feafc303e13d31df5ef70.jpg) (http://www.curry-recipes.co.uk/imagehost/#ca71bbdcbb3feafc303e13d31df5ef70.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Garp on February 09, 2019, 10:44 AM
It’s that time of the year when I start to think about starting off some chillis from seed. I have an 11x6 foot bed going spare at the allotment so went looking for a few of the less common seeds to pack it out with. Logged onto the Dorset Chilli website and saw that everyone else must have had the same idea...whole range sold out. I felt like Old mother Hubbard!

Back to the garden centre then for the usual suspects

https://www.dorsetchillishop.co.uk/category/seeds-and-growing-kits

Hi T.

Try https://www.southdevonchillifarm.co.uk/online-shop/chilli-seeds/ (https://www.southdevonchillifarm.co.uk/online-shop/chilli-seeds/)
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on February 11, 2019, 04:10 PM
Chilli Plug plants should be available in march, thats how i got my Dorset Naga's last year, i bought three, two of which didnt do well because the holes in the pots were too smalland didn't drain, they are currently all cut back to the stem in a cabin in the garden, hopefully come march they will liven up, easier to grow than from seed imo.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Ghoulie on February 13, 2019, 11:51 AM
Had a superchilli plant just hanging on from overwatering last year that still seemed green in its stems.  Saw flickers of green leaves sprouting in conservatory in December so brought it indoors where the leaves grew a little, watered a little when they began to droop and responded ok each time.  Suddenly largest leaves started to wilt and didn't respond to water - so repotted and added a little growmore granules.  Not looking good at all - so back into conservatory where at least it will catch some sun. Not exactly hopeful.  My dads green fingers I have not inherited !
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on February 13, 2019, 12:22 PM
You may be ok, just don't water it, even during the growing season feed em but let them dry out before feeding them, curry leaf trees and lemon trees are the same, My Naga plants look dead at the moment but hopefully spring will see them shoot again.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: JonG on March 01, 2019, 08:26 AM
You’ve inspired me!  I’ve never tried growing chillies from seed before but I picked up a packet of seeds at the garden centre yesterday.  It says they are “Cayenne Long Slim” Capsicum annuum L and I doubt they’re anything special on the heat scale, but I’ll have a go anyway.

Any tips please?  Do I soak the seeds to start, or just put them in mini pots and start watering?  I’ll keep them indoors on a windowsill, but what’s the right time to put them outside where they will get more light? 
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on March 01, 2019, 08:55 AM
When they have formed a strong set of leaves you can pot on to a warm sunny place, until that time keep them warm and the soil moist, move by holding the leaves and gently support the root from underneath, don't hold the stem, good luck :)
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Garp on March 01, 2019, 02:08 PM
I was also inspired, Jon, and planted three varieties about two and a half weeks ago. Germination hasn't been great but got seven seedlings so far :)

(http://www.curry-recipes.co.uk/imagehost/pics/f613f6dc35c1728aaaceadc2d0e1e138.png) (http://www.curry-recipes.co.uk/imagehost/#f613f6dc35c1728aaaceadc2d0e1e138.png)

(http://www.curry-recipes.co.uk/imagehost/pics/6cf995dfffec4c23f1fbb36c6bba3193.png) (http://www.curry-recipes.co.uk/imagehost/#6cf995dfffec4c23f1fbb36c6bba3193.png)
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on March 01, 2019, 02:17 PM
Nicely coming on, JonG if your seeds are in seedling pots the above pic shows the ideal size  for you to pot on into 3" pots.

Garp i find it fascinating that as i get older growing stuff becomes more enjoyable, esp from seed and cuttings, its like one is creating something, and no i have no interest at the moment in feeding Daisies  :)
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: JonG on March 01, 2019, 02:18 PM
Great picture there Garp and I’m impressed with such rapid progress if you only planted them a couple of weeks ago. Maybe I should wait a bit before I plant mine as I can see them getting to a point where they should move outside, but maybe the frosts will still be around.

Thanks for the info Mickey, I will start them in small pots and then move them carefully.  I read online it’s a good idea to start the seeds in damp kitchen paper in a warm cupboard until they sprout, so you don’t waste time with dead seeds.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on March 01, 2019, 02:28 PM
Great picture there Garp and I’m impressed with such rapid progress if you only planted them a couple of weeks ago. Maybe I should wait a bit before I plant mine as I can see them getting to a point where they should move outside, but maybe the frosts will still be around.

Thanks for the info Mickey, I will start them in small pots and then move them carefully.  I read online it’s a good idea to start the seeds in damp kitchen paper in a warm cupboard until they sprout, so you don’t waste time with dead seeds.

Yep i tried that two years ago with Dorset Naga seeds i bought on eBay, i think the important thing is stable moisture and temperature, some chilli seeds like it nice and warm, and keep watching for the leaves to show so you can get them into the light.
This winter i think i will get a small underfloor heating kit, foam insulation board, self levelling compound and make my own tray.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on March 01, 2019, 02:31 PM
Chilli Plug plants should be available in march, thats how i got my Dorset Naga's last year, i bought three, two of which didnt do well because the holes in the pots were too smalland didn't drain, they are currently all cut back to the stem in a cabin in the garden, hopefully come march they will liven up, easier to grow than from seed imo.

Update, all three have gone to chilli heaven :( i will try to overwinter again this year.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Garp on March 01, 2019, 05:15 PM
Garp i find it fascinating that as i get older growing stuff becomes more enjoyable, esp from seed and cuttings, its like one is creating something

I agree, Micky, but I also think you have to have a naturally inquisitive mind (or maybe that inquisitiveness comes more with age). As in my cooking, I like to try to create something from scratch using the most basic building blocks. That is why I don't like using commercial pastes/powders in my BIR (unless I have previously managed to replicate said paste/powder from scratch).

Maybe I should wait a bit before I plant mine as I can see them getting to a point where they should move outside, but maybe the frosts will still be around.

I'm no expert, Jon, but I'd be getting them started asap, to give you more chance of them producing fruit.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on March 01, 2019, 06:44 PM
As Garp say's get them underway to get the fruit, i gave in and just ordered a heat mat on Ebay for just over £11, on monday some chillies will be coming out of the freezer for the seeds
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Madrasandy on March 02, 2019, 10:44 AM
As Garp say's get them underway to get the fruit, i gave in and just ordered a heat mat on Ebay for just over £11, on monday some chillies will be coming out of the freezer for the seeds

Your using frozen seeds ?
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Madrasandy on March 02, 2019, 10:56 AM
This years
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on March 02, 2019, 11:07 AM
Their looking good, what are they?

Frozen, yep quite a few gardening type forums said no probs, + RHS store frozen seeds for future use, so i will post how they get on.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Madrasandy on March 02, 2019, 11:14 AM
The larger chillies are superhots, E Naga, some naga crosses, original 7 pot, fatalii, SRTSL, BOC, Nepalese naga, the seedlings are Kashmiri, finger, jalapeño and peppercini
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on March 02, 2019, 01:54 PM
Do you use them to make pastes and stuff as well as cooking with them?, you have a lot of plants there.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: JonG on March 10, 2019, 11:01 AM
Well I put six seeds into damp kitchen paper when I last posted to this thread and in 9 days only one has sprouted. Not sure what to make of that, but the successful seed has been transplanted into a small pot today, so let’s hope it results in a plant.

Due to the low success rate I’ve started 6 new seeds off today in kitchen paper and have moved them plus the 5 unsprouted original ones to a warmer place.  I’ll come back in a week or two and see how they are faring.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on March 10, 2019, 11:59 AM
Some seeds are critical of temperature and moisture control, if they are kept warm generally the germination rate will increase
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Garp on March 10, 2019, 12:14 PM
Good luck Jon :)
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Madrasandy on March 10, 2019, 12:54 PM
Do you use them to make pastes and stuff as well as cooking with them?, you have a lot of plants there.

I make my own chilli ketchup, super hot chilli pickle, various other sauces etc. Just getting into fermenting then too.
The ones I don’t use I dry or sell in 500g boxes. Amazing how many chillies you can get off 1 plant, here is just 1 pick from 4 plants
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: curryhell on March 10, 2019, 01:07 PM
WOW, that's a whole lot of lovely looking fresh chilis MA :-*
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: JonG on March 10, 2019, 01:07 PM
Thanks guys and wow, that’s an inspiring picture from Andy. I’ll be happy with a few finger chillies, if I get that far.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Madrasandy on March 10, 2019, 01:28 PM
WOW, that's a whole lot of lovely looking fresh chilis MA :-*
Cheers, all were superhots, but this year I have some Kashmir and finger chillies on the go too, looking forward to making my own powder with the Kashmiri
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on March 11, 2019, 08:40 AM
WOW, that's a whole lot of lovely looking fresh chilis MA :-*
Cheers, all were superhots, but this year I have some Kashmir and finger chillies on the go too, looking forward to making my own powder with the Kashmiri

You should be proud of that crop of chillies, good effort. How are you going to dry your `kashmir chillies, then will you just grind them up as required?
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Madrasandy on March 11, 2019, 01:20 PM
You should be proud of that crop of chillies, good effort. How are you going to dry your `kashmir chillies, then will you just grind them up as required?

I have a dehydrator, I will then just grind in small batches
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on March 11, 2019, 01:32 PM
You should be proud of that crop of chillies, good effort. How are you going to dry your `kashmir chillies, then will you just grind them up as required?

I have a dehydrator, I will then just grind in small batches

YAYYYY, cool i love Gadgets.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: JonG on March 17, 2019, 02:23 PM
Update: the remaining 5 seeds from my original 6 batch have sprouted and been potted up. Now I have one which shows two tiny leaves above the soil and two which are just in the process of bursting through the soil.

I’ve taken the advice above about temperature, but how important is light?  I’ve dangled an led lightbulb above the little seedlings, but it’s only a 3W 250 lumen bulb.  I see LED grow lamps on eBay with red and blue leds and rated between 600-1000W!  Do my plants stand a chance of thriving without such extreme lighting?
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: livo on March 17, 2019, 02:33 PM
Pretty useless using lighting of the wrong spectrum for plant growth. Check out full spectrum aquarium lighting. Either led or even older fluorescent. You may be able to get 2nd hand.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: JonG on March 17, 2019, 02:42 PM
Ok - could you elaborate?  I just checked the box and the lightbulb I’m using is 2700K.  Are you saying that will be of no benefit?
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on March 17, 2019, 03:55 PM
You want full spectrum grow lights or a nice window, the advantage of grow lights is you can extend the exposure time to strengthen and bring the seeds on, for an idea just look at grow lights on amazon, I think Livo was steering you to a light for a fish tank which would also work and if you get a second hand set up it could save you money, if you did that i would certainly start off with a new tube.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: livo on March 17, 2019, 07:39 PM
Correct. Normal household lighting, whether incandescent, fluorescent or LED, will emit very little light of the type required to sustain plant photosynthesis. You can purchase lighting specifically designed for internal plant growth, used in indoor hydroponics etc, or a cheap alternative would be fish tank (aquarium) lighting.  If you purchase a complete second hand unit the tank itself may function as a terrarium.  Usually, aquarium lighting is of the type required to sustain photosynthesis of aquatic plants and will work for terrestrial plants as well, although probably not as well as specially lighting.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: martinvic on March 17, 2019, 10:55 PM
Or, if possible, you could stick em on a sunny windowsill, with a homemade light reflector behind them.

And again if not too much trouble, when the weather is ok, stick em outside in the sun and bring em back in again.

You'll have to start doing that anyway, to harden em off until frosts are past, if they are going to be grown outside.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: JonG on March 18, 2019, 11:56 AM
Thanks guys. I’ve put them on the windowsill and rigged a reflector out of carboard with kitchen tinfoil glued to it. I’ve taken away my 3W led lightbulb as it sounds like it wasn’t doing anything useful.

If they don’t get enough light do they simply take longer to grow, or will they maybe not develop properly at all?
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Madrasandy on March 18, 2019, 01:14 PM
Get some 6500k T5’s tubes
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: DalPuri on March 18, 2019, 03:21 PM
Tin foil is the worst reflector, it absorbs more than it reflects.
Better off with matt white paint or fork out for some Mylar.

 :)
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Madrasandy on March 18, 2019, 07:57 PM
Tin foil is the worst reflector, it absorbs more than it reflects.
Better off with matt white paint or fork out for some Mylar.

 :)

Yup, don’t ever use tinfoil, emergency blankets on eBay are perfect and very cheap
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: tempest63 on April 04, 2019, 08:25 PM
I got some jalapeño, chocolate habanero, slim Jim’s, and scotch bonnets all growing from seed. Also some Padrons for the Spanish themed dinners.

I couldn’t find the naga and ghost seeds locally but will look for plugs in the local garden centres.

I’m hoping this season is better than last on the allotment as the drought last year meant nothing did very well.

T63
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: tempest63 on April 04, 2019, 08:31 PM
It’s that time of the year when I start to think about starting off some chillis from seed. I have an 11x6 foot bed going spare at the allotment so went looking for a few of the less common seeds to pack it out with. Logged onto the Dorset Chilli website and saw that everyone else must have had the same idea...whole range sold out. I felt like Old mother Hubbard!

Back to the garden centre then for the usual suspects

https://www.dorsetchillishop.co.uk/category/seeds-and-growing-kits

Hi T.

Try https://www.southdevonchillifarm.co.uk/online-shop/chilli-seeds/ (https://www.southdevonchillifarm.co.uk/online-shop/chilli-seeds/)

Thanks for the link, I haven’t been very active so apologies for the delay. I will save the link for later in the year.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: JonG on April 05, 2019, 08:36 AM
Well blow me down, I’ve ended up with 12 seedlings from 12 seeds! Either I’m better at this than I thought, or I got lucky with some easy to germinate seeds....

They’re all still pretty tiny and I haven’t sprung for any grow lamps, so I guess they will take their sweet time to grow. Some now have 4 leaves, others two.

Quite exciting really, I haven’t grown anything in years.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Garp on April 05, 2019, 10:32 AM
Good news Jon. Keep us posted :)
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: JonG on August 09, 2019, 12:42 PM
Hello

I now have about 7 or 8 green finger chillies on my plants - not a great yield from around 12 seeds I started back in Jan.

My question, as a first time chilli grower, is how do you know when to pick them?  They have been on the plant maybe 2 weeks now and do I wait for them to turn yellow or orange or red, or will that in fact happen after picking?

If I wait too long will the chillies go mushy?  Is it even possible to pick too soon or if there’s no mileage in waiting I may as well take them now.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on August 09, 2019, 03:30 PM
Hi Jon,
From what i understand you can pretty much pick them when you want, if not ripe when picked they will not be as hot as if you let them go full term.

If not being used they tend to be either "dried out" by hanging in the sun, or frozen, did you feed them onnce the fruits had set? i remember a guy on youtube saying if you want plants to feed you, you have to feed them.
I havent got a greenhouse or poly tunnel so it is what it is, My Dorset Naga is only going to give a dozen or so.

Remove all fruit if you want to overwinter the plants and have a head start in the spring.....
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Bob-A-Job on August 09, 2019, 09:48 PM
Hi Jon,
From what i understand you can pretty much pick them when you want, if not ripe when picked they will not be as hot as if you let them go full term.

If not being used they tend to be either "dried out" by hanging in the sun, or frozen, did you feed them onnce the fruits had set? i remember a guy on youtube saying if you want plants to feed you, you have to feed them.
I havent got a greenhouse or poly tunnel so it is what it is, My Dorset Naga is only going to give a dozen or so.

Remove all fruit if you want to overwinter the plants and have a head start in the spring.....

All sound advice, especially the feeding and de-fruiting.  I have also found that as the days shorten any flowers will fail to bear fruit and can also be picked off.  I also 'top off' my plants by picking out the top growth shoots to prevent the plant becoming 'leggy' as it tries to grow to the light and will in spring 'bush' out more, producing more fruit.

The only thing I would add is that if they are supposed to change colour, wait, let them and use/freeze when ripe.  If you are unsure, then when most fruits over-ripen, the skin will begin to wrinkle.  I have found the optimum time is right before that or when they literally are beginning to wrinkle.  Different fruit on the same plant will ripen at different times so no need to pick them all at the same time.

I hope that helps.

BAJ
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: JonG on August 10, 2019, 06:46 AM
Thanks guys, I will probably pick them as it will be easy for me to forget them otherwise, and I don’t want wrinkled up dry chillies.

I guess there’s not much chance of overwintering a sunlight hungry plant like this, unless I want to invest in one of those grow lamps?  Next year I’ll try to start the seeds earlier, as it felt like I was playing catch up the whole time and only got small plants, just two of which bore chillies.

It’s been fun though, and proved that I can grow chillies at home. probably an earlier start next year and a bit more light in that initial stage after they sprouted will give me better results I hope.
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on August 10, 2019, 08:15 AM
No you don’t need a lamp, you just cut back the plant and keep the soil just moist, as long as it doesn’t go below zero you have a 50/50 chance of the plant surviving, they go dormant and look dead but awake in the spring, do not feed until you see signs of new buds..
There is stacks of stuff on YouTube about overwintering chilli plants, have a go
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: Ghoulie on August 28, 2019, 10:06 AM
I managed to get 5 years out of some of my chilli plants.  Excess chillis - I dry them in the oven for 6 hours @ 50 deg C- then grind to a powder & store
Title: Re: Growing time disappointment
Post by: mickyp on August 29, 2019, 09:39 AM
Ive lost every one so far, i have cut them back, kept them in a frost free environment but clearly not got the soil conditions right, ie just moist. i shall be trying again this winter.