Author Topic: Chef Abdul salam  (Read 6080 times)

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Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Chef Abdul salam
« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2020, 05:42 PM »
But it is very much what I used to eat in a real Indian (i.e., full of Indian customers) café in Grafton Way (north end of Tottenham Court Road) in the late 60's/early 70's, so I have great hopes when I get around to cooking (a smaller version of) this dish ...
« Last Edit: May 17, 2020, 08:07 PM by Peripatetic Phil »
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Online martinvic

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Re: Chef Abdul salam
« Reply #21 on: May 17, 2020, 10:57 PM »
Not really BIR is it?

It's obviously not a single-dish typical BIR curry, no. I think it's more like a staff curry.

Doesn't he even state at the start that it's a home style curry


Online Garp

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Re: Chef Abdul salam
« Reply #22 on: May 17, 2020, 11:07 PM »
The description of the video is below:

COOKING CHICKEN CURRY WITH BASE GRAVY BRITISH INDIAN RESTAURANT (BIR)


Offline livo

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Re: Chef Abdul salam
« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2020, 02:12 AM »
1960                                                                                                    £9.95
Inspired by Bangladeshi home cooking, succulent pieces of chicken stewed &
cooked replicating the true home cooking experience.
Whiskey is the answer, but what was the question?


Offline romain

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Re: Chef Abdul salam
« Reply #24 on: May 18, 2020, 03:15 AM »
The beef curry is just (insert just about anyone Indian you know) home cooking. Close to my heart - I grew up on it and still cook like that a lot.

This chicken curry/thick onion puree approach has me intrigued. I think there's something good here -  I just need to play with it a bit to figure it out. I doubt he just gave up his full technique (it's his signature dish after all) but he does give (me at least) a lot to think about.

I looked at the reviews for this restaurant. There are a few of the usual "my coffee was too expensive so I am giving it 1 star" idiot reviews but overall it seems extremely well reviewed.
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Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Chef Abdul salam
« Reply #25 on: May 18, 2020, 09:24 AM »
Personally, I don't give a t@ss whether it is "genuine BIR" (is there such a thing ?), "fusion BIR", "fusion home-style", or "pure traditional Indian cooking" — so long as it makes a good, interesting, flavoursome dish, what the h@ll does it matter into which categor{y|ies} it fits ?

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Offline livo

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Re: Chef Abdul salam
« Reply #26 on: May 18, 2020, 11:43 AM »
Yeah, but it's not a Madraloo, a Jalpioza or a Vindanaga.  Must be some foreign muck. Chicken with bones. Phhhhh. :lol:

Sorry. I couldn't help it. That wasn't very BIR of me.

I'll stop now. :Clown:
« Last Edit: May 18, 2020, 11:54 AM by livo »
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Offline pap rika

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Re: Chef Abdul salam
« Reply #27 on: May 18, 2020, 01:28 PM »
This chicken curry/thick onion puree approach has me intrigued. I think there's something good here -  I just need to play with it a bit to figure it out. I doubt he just gave up his full technique (it's his signature dish after all) but he does give (me at least) a lot to think about.

Romain
              This is a similar puree approach I now use as standard, for me it is achievable by the use of a slow cooker. Think of reverse engineering whereby your aim is to remove as much liquid as possible whilst retaining or intensifying the flavour.
  Proceed with your base to the point prior to adding any liquid, then transfer ingredients to a slow cooker, just cover with water and cook on low heat, adding more water only when and if needed, When you see the oil rise and are happy with the reduction liquidize the contents, carton up or cook further till required consistency is achieved. The only warning I will give is to carefully remove the skin which will form around the interior rim of the cooker as it reduces prior to liquidizing. It can give a burnt taste if left in.
  For me it works, I now have 12 portion's within three 300 ml containers. Instead of the usual 12 containers, great space saver, I am also able to defrost each portion quicker, whilst adding the appropriate liquid/stock to suit the dish i.e.chicken, beef, lamb vegetarian etc. Further enhancing the flavour of the dish. Like I said it works for me, try it, you might like

Regards pap rika


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Re: Chef Abdul salam
« Reply #28 on: May 18, 2020, 01:49 PM »
Yeah, but it's not a Madraloo, a Jalpioza or a Vindanaga.  Must be some foreign muck. Chicken with bones. Phhhhh. :lol:

Sorry. I couldn't help it. That wasn't very BIR of me.

Seems a bit airy-fairy, to my mind ... !
« Last Edit: May 18, 2020, 04:10 PM by Peripatetic Phil »
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Offline romain

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Re: Chef Abdul salam
« Reply #29 on: May 18, 2020, 07:54 PM »
This chicken curry/thick onion puree approach has me intrigued. I think there's something good here -  I just need to play with it a bit to figure it out. I doubt he just gave up his full technique (it's his signature dish after all) but he does give (me at least) a lot to think about.

Romain
              This is a similar puree approach I now use as standard, for me it is achievable by the use of a slow cooker. Think of reverse engineering whereby your aim is to remove as much liquid as possible whilst retaining or intensifying the flavour.
  Proceed with your base to the point prior to adding any liquid, then transfer ingredients to a slow cooker, just cover with water and cook on low heat, adding more water only when and if needed, When you see the oil rise and are happy with the reduction liquidize the contents, carton up or cook further till required consistency is achieved. The only warning I will give is to carefully remove the skin which will form around the interior rim of the cooker as it reduces prior to liquidizing. It can give a burnt taste if left in.
  For me it works, I now have 12 portion's within three 300 ml containers. Instead of the usual 12 containers, great space saver, I am also able to defrost each portion quicker, whilst adding the appropriate liquid/stock to suit the dish i.e.chicken, beef, lamb vegetarian etc. Further enhancing the flavour of the dish. Like I said it works for me, try it, you might like

Regards pap rika

Thanks pap rika. I'm actually thinking of this as a way to get larger volume of curry with the texture of the usual Indian restaurant curry. I have always wondered how they do it those lunch buffets. Not traditional but not the usual cook to order either. And still (depending on the particular restaurant) very tasty. Interesting stuff to play with for sure.
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