Author Topic: BRITISH-IAN FOOD IN THE MAKING  (Read 5702 times)

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Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: BRITISH-IAN FOOD IN THE MAKING
« Reply #110 on: June 23, 2020, 06:47 PM »
Earlier this week I made a second batch of Syed's chicken tikka as planned, on this occasion substituting Laziza tandoori paste for Patak's (no other changes).  My wife made one of her increasingly rare trips home from the hotel to bring me some shopping essentials, and she and I shared two skewers of chicken tikka (with Nirshaan chapati and home-made mint sauce, as per previous post).  We both agreed that the Laziza version is better than the Patak's, so I shall feed this back to Syed and seek his views.

** Phil.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2020, 07:24 AM by Peripatetic Phil »
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Offline curryhell

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Re: BRITISH-IAN FOOD IN THE MAKING
« Reply #111 on: June 28, 2020, 08:52 PM »
.. am going to do My Special 'KILLER PHAL' Very soon.
Now this I am looking forward to  It's been a long while since I had a good rectum wrecker lol
So singe baby singe, the curry's getting better ..........


Offline curryhell

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Re: BRITISH-IAN FOOD IN THE MAKING
« Reply #112 on: June 28, 2020, 08:59 PM »
Here is a bir curry journal YouTube is the wild west
Nicely put ELW. A typical wild west saloon, full of many chancers who think they're really skilled players  :wink:
So singe baby singe, the curry's getting better ..........

Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: BRITISH-IAN FOOD IN THE MAKING
« Reply #113 on: June 29, 2020, 06:28 PM »
I was trying to work out what to cook this evening (basic chicken curry, bhuna chicken, chicken Madras) and felt tempted to try the Madras again just because it had been so disappointing last time.  But before committing myself, I thought that I would compare the two recipes (basic chicken curry, chicken Madras) to see if I could identify the difference that had caused me to love one and be somewhat disappointed by the other.  So I put them up side-by-side, in Word.  And I was staggered (nay, flabbergasted) to find that, as far as I can see, they differ only in the amount of Syed's curry powder used.  1/2 tsp for the basic curry, 1 tsp for the Madras.  I would be really grateful if another member could compare their transcriptions of these two curries and let me know whether they can identify any other substantive differences.  In the meantime, I think I will make a bhuna !

[Update] Which indeed I did.  And it was excellent.  Made to spec., apart from a few deviations : (1) 120gm pre-cooked chicken instead of 100gm (five pieces just did not look quite enough [1]); (2) spices added before dilute tomato purée and cooked for maybe 30–40 seconds before purée added [2]; and (3) four fresh green chillies added with the last 1/2 ladle base.  I would say (with absolutely no disrespect intended to Syed) that the last (the fresh green chillies) really add something — the texture and the mild burn, when eaten at the same time as the chicken, just lift the dish to another level.  Oh, and I phased the addition of the base — one ladle at a time, reducing down to bhuna consistency before adding the next.  I ate the bhuna with chapati, as I always used to do those many many years ago when I used to have an Indian meal for lunch in the Finchley Road at least once a week, and I think that the two just go so well together.  Pulao rice is OK with a thin curry, but a thick curry really needs a chapati. When I had finished eating up the chicken, there was still some sauce left, so I tried it with some pulao rice — the combination was OK, but nothing special.

[1] I now realise that my transcript is in error.  Syed initially said 200 gm chicken, then corrected it to 100 gm, but when I look at the amount of chicken that he added compared to my 120 gm, it is clear that he was right in the first place and in fact added 200 gm.  This is confirmed about half way through, when he transfers half of the curry to a serving dish and then starts making a second curry with what remains.  So I added too little chicken, not too much, but for one person it was just the right amount. 

[2] I now do this with all of Syed's recipes.  I think that he adds the tomato purée first to avoid the possibility of his viewers burning the raw ground spices, but I also think that when you have been making curries for as long as most CR0 members have, you know that you can safely add the spices direct to the oil/garlic/onion/salt mix and cook the rawness out before adding the purée.

** Phil.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2020, 08:53 PM by Peripatetic Phil »
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Offline Robbo141

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Re: BRITISH-IAN FOOD IN THE MAKING
« Reply #114 on: June 29, 2020, 11:13 PM »
I will do this check Phil and report back.  I keep a spreadsheet that notes each ingredient used in a particular dish, as I search for consistencies in what works for me.  Eg recently I noticed the dishes I rate highest had no whole spices flavouring the oil in the very beginning.  Of course, my techniques are not finely honed enough to be able to eliminate that variability, but have to start somewhere.

Robbo

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Re: BRITISH-IAN FOOD IN THE MAKING
« Reply #115 on: June 30, 2020, 08:09 PM »
Many thanks, Robbo.  In the meantime I have put Syed's four most basic recipes (chicken curry, bhuna, Madras, vindaloo) into an Excel spreadsheet (attached).  The units used are those specified by Syed1, but in the "FOAM" columns ("Fixated On Accurate Measurement"), these are normalised to ml or mg.  Conversion is by way of a lookup table, so if you don't agree that one ladle = 80ml, for example, or that one chef's spoon = 3.5 tablespoon = 52.5 ml, you can make one change and all cells expressed in that unit will be automatically re-computed. What I found remarkable is the similarity between the quantities for each of the first three recipes.

Spreadsheet attached, masquerading as a .txt file; simply save as .xlsx and open in Excel. or (if your browser allows) open it directly in Excel and when Excel says (paraphrase) "This is not a text file — are you sure you want to open it ?", answer "yes".

** Phil.
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[1] Where, for example, Syed says "a bit more than half a teaspoon", I mentally convert that to a fraction and then increase both numerator and denominator by 1, so that (for example) "a bit more than half a teaspoon" -> "a bit more than 1/2 teaspoon" -> "2/3 teaspoon"
« Last Edit: July 01, 2020, 08:08 PM by Peripatetic Phil »
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Offline Robbo141

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Re: BRITISH-IAN FOOD IN THE MAKING
« Reply #116 on: July 01, 2020, 01:08 AM »
Excellent, thanks Phil.  Although somewhat skeptical on first moving to the US, I am now fully embracing the concept of the ‘cup’ as a standard measure and have a full set of stainless measures of fractions thereof.  They complement my beautiful stainless measuring spoons for TBSP, tsp, 1/2tsp and 1/4tsp.  All of which must be measured level.  Heaped just has too much variability for my analytical mind, especially given my lack of ability.
Syed’s basic curry was described by mrs robbo as the best she’s ever had.  Was OK for me but needed heat.
I put a comment on Syed’s YouTube video of his vindaloo, saying I didn’t get the result I wanted, but not down to his recipe at all.  (I used my current stock of Instant Pot Base and Romain mix powder, but pledged to try it again using his recipes for those). He gave me his email address and has since sent me a revised recipe, which I will try soon.  What a very good man.

Robbo


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Re: BRITISH-IAN FOOD IN THE MAKING
« Reply #117 on: July 01, 2020, 08:08 AM »
Excellent, thanks Phil.  Although somewhat skeptical on first moving to the US, I am now fully embracing the concept of the ‘cup’ as a standard measure and have a full set of stainless measures of fractions thereof. 

OMG :)  Solely for the purpose of replicating some of Syed's measurements, I hunted around my zillions of tall narrow translucent plastic containers and found one that contains exactly half a cup.  Very useful.  But I still use my coffee spoons to measure his "less than a teaspoon".

Quote
They complement my beautiful stainless measuring spoons for TBSP, tsp, 1/2tsp and 1/4tsp.  All of which must be measured level.  Heaped just has too much variability for my analytical mind, especially given my lack of ability.  Syed’s basic curry was described by mrs robbo as the best she’s ever had.  Was OK for me but needed heat.

Well, I had to go into the hotel yesterday (as stand-in delivery boy for our take-away service, our previous delivery man having resigned), so I took the opportunity to pick up a T/A from Ganesha.  Whether Ganesha's standards have fallen or whether mine have improved under Syed's tuition, I wot not, but I actually preferred Syed's basic chicken curry to Ganesha's chicken Madras.  And Syed's rice was also better than Ganesha's.  What I did notice, when I put my analytic hat on, was that the predominant sensation/taste/whatever that came from the Madras was chilli heat — I could not pick up on any other one spice, yet the sauce was not thin, so it either had a very high onion content or the bulk of the spicing (apart from the chilli) was relatively bland.

Quote
I put a comment on Syed’s YouTube video of his vindaloo, saying I didn’t get the result I wanted, but not down to his recipe at all.  (I used my current stock of Instant Pot Base and Romain mix powder, but pledged to try it again using his recipes for those). He gave me his email address and has since sent me a revised recipe, which I will try soon.  What a very good man.

I completely concur with your last statement.  His recent chicken liver curry was at my request.  Are you at liberty, do you think, to send me his revised vindaloo recipe by PM ?

** Phil.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2020, 10:04 AM by Peripatetic Phil »
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Offline Robbo141

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Re: BRITISH-IAN FOOD IN THE MAKING
« Reply #118 on: July 01, 2020, 11:48 PM »
When skill, knowledge, experience and a good eye can’t be relied on.  I love my spoons.



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Re: BRITISH-IAN FOOD IN THE MAKING
« Reply #119 on: July 02, 2020, 11:34 AM »
Oh, your measuring spoons are expressed in vulgar fractions.  The spreadsheet variant that I was developing for you won't be of much help, then — it expresses quantities as a decimal fraction of a cup, as in :

  • Oil 0.222 cups
  • Ghee 0.021 cups
  • Garlic 0.01 cups
  • Onion 0.02 cups
  • Salt 0.005 cups
  • Purée 0.063 cups
  • Spice mix 0.01 cups
  • Kasoori methi 0.032 cups
  • Ground chillies / paprika (optional)
  • Chilli paste 0 cups
  • Base 1.181 cups
  • Fresh green chillies (optional)

I could, I suppose, convert everything to vulgar fractions :

  • Oil 1/4 cup
  • Ghee 1/64 cup
  • Garlic 1/128 cup
  • Onion 3/16 cup
  • Salt 1/256 cup
  • Purée 1/16 cup
  • Spice mix 1/128 cup
  • Kasoori methi 1/32 cup
  • Ground chillies / paprika  (as desired, optional)
  • Chilli paste 0 cups
  • Base 13/16 cups
  • Fresh green chillies (as desired, optional)

Would that help ?

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