Author Topic: Syed dry-fried mix powder  (Read 24858 times)

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Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Syed dry-fried mix powder
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2020, 08:36 AM »
Different chefs may use their various ways to achieve this (

Offline Secret Santa

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Re: Syed dry-fried mix powder
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2020, 03:03 PM »
try it then if dont like it that would make sense you owe it to your taste buds and long suffering readers of this forum.

I fully intend trying it. In fact, I already would have if it weren't for the fact that my fridge/freezer is jam packed to bursting with covid19 survival supplies.


Offline Secret Santa

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Re: Syed dry-fried mix powder
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2020, 03:08 PM »
In fact, Ranjit Rai coined the term "singe-fry" in his 1990 Curry, curry, curry ...

I always thought singe-fry was a ridiculous term as bhargar or tadka were already in existence and described the action just as well.

Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Syed dry-fried mix powder
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2020, 03:38 PM »
I always thought singe-fry was a ridiculous term as bhargar or tadka were already in existence and described the action just as well.

I think that Pandit Rai was aiming at hoi polloi, Santa (you know, the chap on the top deck of the No. 53 Clapham Common omnibus).  He would know what "singe" was, and "fry" of course, but "tadka" might put rather too great a strain on "'ees leetle grey cells" and if you suggested he should "bhagar" something you'd probably end up in casualty ...
« Last Edit: June 01, 2020, 09:39 PM by Peripatetic Phil »


Offline livo

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Re: Syed dry-fried mix powder
« Reply #14 on: June 01, 2020, 09:26 PM »
I made this mix. about 2 weeks ago it still is fresh with same aromas so shelf life is ok.
It's good to know the fried powders are fine after 2 weeks. Further time will tell if the potency drops in comparison to a non-heated version.  It may be an idea to make a batch raw and only roast smaller amounts as required.

I've recently made 3 different spice mixes by individually roasting whole spices, cooling and grinding. The Sri Lankan Jaffna and Chicken Masala and a freshly ground Garam Masala. There is no doubt that freshly roasted and ground Masala is more potent than older stale powders.

This fried / roasted powder is a very interesting idea and something that is obviously new to nearly everybody. You've only to read the comments here and on the video to see that it is a "new" concept.

Offline noble ox

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Re: Syed dry-fried mix powder
« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2020, 09:44 PM »
Just to be pedantic the spices are heated in a non stick pan to smoking point and NOT fried

Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Syed dry-fried mix powder
« Reply #16 on: June 01, 2020, 10:42 PM »
Sense 2 of "fry, n." in the OED would seem to sanction the use of "fry" in this context :

Quote
to burn or scorch (anything) with effects analogous to those of frying;

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« Last Edit: June 02, 2020, 08:57 AM by Peripatetic Phil »


Offline livo

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Re: Syed dry-fried mix powder
« Reply #17 on: June 02, 2020, 04:18 AM »
Just to inform, the question about longevity / shelf life has been answered by Syed in the Video's comments.  There is no problem with a reduced shelf life for these "heat treated" spice powders.

The next obvious question for me; Can this heat treatment technique be applied to any variation of Mixed Powder?  I'm about to run out of my own blend (5:4:3:2:2:1:1) so I can see some experimentation happening.

The follow up question: Is there any need to have a "Madras Curry Powder" as one of the larger volume ingredients, or at all for that matter, in the Mixed Powder?  Syed's doesn't but in my analysis of 8 popular powders a few years back they all did.  I guess not surprisingly, this is one of the first questions I had as a novice to mixed powders.

Online Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Syed dry-fried mix powder
« Reply #18 on: June 02, 2020, 08:06 AM »
It is an addition that I have never understood, Livo, especially when it is to a generic rather than to a specific brand.  Why add a as a mixture ("Madras curry powder") more of the same spices that one is planning to add individually, especially when the proportions in the commercial mixture are an unknown ?  The only possible benefit could be if the Madras curry powder contains trace quantities of spices that one is not planning to add individually, but in such small quantities that it would be virtually impossible to measure them using domestic equipment. 

And then, of course, the vast majority of recipes go on to specify that the "mix powder" is only one of several spices to be added.  So the typical recipe calls for (e.g.,) turmeric, plus turmeric as a part of the mix powder, plus turmeric as a part of the Madras curry powder[1] that forms a part of the mix powder.

I continue to remain completely baffled by this arcane practice.

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[1] Khanum Madras hot curry powder ingredients :  coriander, turmeric, chillies, mustard, Bengal gram flour, cumin, salt, black pepper, fenugreek, garlic.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2020, 09:07 AM by Peripatetic Phil »

Offline Hugoboss

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Re: Syed dry-fried mix powder
« Reply #19 on: June 02, 2020, 08:21 AM »
I made this mix. about 2 weeks ago it still is fresh with same aromas so shelf life is ok.
It's good to know the fried powders are fine after 2 weeks. Further time will tell if the potency drops in comparison to a non-heated version.  It may be an idea to make a batch raw and only roast smaller amounts as required.

Thats what I did last night. Made up a smaller raw batch and dry roasted it in a small pan first - just enough for 2 portions. Closest to BIR aroma and taste I have ever got to after all these years. I dont notmally post on Forums, I just lurk in the background ! However, this dry roasting of the powdered spices is a revelation for me and I just had to give feedback  :evil:


 

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