Author Topic: Off-topic replies  (Read 3023 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Peripatetic Phil

  • Genius Curry Master
  • Contributing member
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7843
  • Blessèd are those with an open mind ...
    • View Profile
    • The Westberry Hotel / Hôi~An Restaurant
Re: Pork, pulled and otherwise
« Reply #70 on: November 23, 2020, 01:48 PM »
Sadly not, Robbo — pulled pork made its first appearance in the mid-eighties, by which time my palate was already more-or-less set in stone, and as a result it has never really appealed to me.  I did try it once, but rather like artichoke hearts or avocado, it did nothing for me, and I rapidly returned to the "real" world [1] of roast-pork-and-crackling and sweet-and-sour-pork.

** Phil.
--------
[1] Or as Sir John Betjeman might have said:
Quote
Safe were those mealtimes of my post-war world
When roast pork gleamed on antique porcelain ...
« Last Edit: November 23, 2020, 02:25 PM by Peripatetic Phil »
Ogham's law :  The probable value of a message varies inversely as the number of emoticons and/or emoji that it contains.

Offline romain

  • Head Chef
  • ***
  • Posts: 152
    • View Profile
    • glebe kitchen
Re: Pork, pulled and otherwise
« Reply #71 on: November 24, 2020, 12:20 AM »
Sadly not, Robbo — pulled pork made its first appearance in the mid-eighties, by which time my palate was already more-or-less set in stone, and as a result it has never really appealed to me.  I did try it once, but rather like artichoke hearts or avocado, it did nothing for me, and I rapidly returned to the "real" world [1] of roast-pork-and-crackling and sweet-and-sour-pork.

** Phil.
--------
[1] Or as Sir John Betjeman might have said:
Quote
Safe were those mealtimes of my post-war world
When roast pork gleamed on antique porcelain ...

The name may have appeared or been popularized in late 1970s but the concept of southern BBQ pork pre-dates the US civil war. Surely you aren't that old :smile2:

I'm with Robbo - pork butt with a nice bark and maybe a little Carolina mustard sauce is wonderful stuff although I real Texas brisket done right is still by far my favourite.

Robbo - I've managed to eat at Franklin's once in my life. It was truly incredible. I've eaten my way across Central Texas a few times and that meal is still the best I've had.
glebekitchen.com


Online Peripatetic Phil

  • Genius Curry Master
  • Contributing member
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7843
  • Blessèd are those with an open mind ...
    • View Profile
    • The Westberry Hotel / Hôi~An Restaurant
Re: Pork, pulled and otherwise
« Reply #72 on: November 24, 2020, 09:38 AM »
The name [pulled pork] may have appeared or been popularized in late 1970s but the concept of southern BBQ pork pre-dates the US civil war.

But does "Southern BBQ pork" also imply "pulled" ? I have nothing against barbecued pork (a real hog roast is excellent), it is just that the pulling seems to detract from the dish ...
Ogham's law :  The probable value of a message varies inversely as the number of emoticons and/or emoji that it contains.

Offline livo

  • Jedi Curry Master
  • *********
  • Posts: 2158
    • View Profile
Re: Pork, pulled and otherwise
« Reply #73 on: November 24, 2020, 10:49 AM »
Well, sounds like someone butchered a pig and no one wants bacon.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2020, 10:57 AM by Peripatetic Phil »
Whiskey is the answer, but what was the question?


Offline romain

  • Head Chef
  • ***
  • Posts: 152
    • View Profile
    • glebe kitchen
Re: Pork, pulled and otherwise
« Reply #74 on: November 24, 2020, 01:51 PM »
The name [pulled pork] may have appeared or been popularized in late 1970s but the concept of southern BBQ pork pre-dates the US civil war.

But does "Southern BBQ pork" also imply "pulled" ? I have nothing against barbecued pork (a real hog roast is excellent), it is just that the pulling seems to detract from the dish ...

I don't know if they shredded or chopped it (or likely some combination of both as they served) it but it has its roots in barbacoa which, in Mexico at least, is shredded.

I've done a couple whole hogs and a few suckling pigs and I'm fairly certain it's not possible to entirely carve it into nice slices.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/the-evolution-of-american-barbecue-13770775/


glebekitchen.com

Offline livo

  • Jedi Curry Master
  • *********
  • Posts: 2158
    • View Profile
Butter (bells), ghee, frying, temperatures, room heating, etc.
« Reply #75 on: December 03, 2020, 08:24 AM »
Say what?   :omg: :omg: :omg: Next you'll be telling us there's trans-fats in doughnuts and cookies, or sugar in soda and there is magic addictive fat / salt / sugar ratio that engages the human brain's subconscious natural primordial instincts to eat more and gain weight.

You only live once.  Eat fatty bacon, fry your eggs in butter, drink your bourbon with real Coke.

I love coconut oil smeared over a lithe, tanned (potential melanoma*) body (or at least I used to many years ago but I don't go to the beach any more).  :Clown:  I loathe it as a cooking product and the jury is out as to it's health benefits or deficits.  When my daughter cooks with it, the house is immediately full of fumes that make it impossible for me to breath.   :patient:  I have to go outside until the air has cleared.  That can't be good.  :dislike:

* I am a melanoma survivor of 30 years after stage 3 / 4 radical lymphadenectomy. (Anaplastic Metastatic Malignant Melanoma in the lymph nodes at age 30 but still upright.)
« Last Edit: December 09, 2020, 11:58 AM by Peripatetic Phil »
Whiskey is the answer, but what was the question?

Offline livo

  • Jedi Curry Master
  • *********
  • Posts: 2158
    • View Profile
Re: Butter, ghee, frying, temperatures, room heating, etc.
« Reply #76 on: December 03, 2020, 08:46 AM »
I have noticed in many videos of takeaway kitchens a pot of vegetable ghee and/or butter ghee. I can understand the use of butter ghee for extra flavour in some dishes and for basting tandoor meats and breads but the use of veg ghee still baffles me. The nearest consistent reason I can find for its use is that it has a very high smoke point so they can really whack the burner to max when in a hurry with no chance of ruining the oil by overheating it. It's certainly not a budgetary choice as both are much more expensive than a catering can of veg oil.

And, of course, both are significantly bad for the health if eaten regularly.

I've long suspected that the contents of the cans are not as originally supplied.  Perhaps the used cans are just a convenient method of having vegetable oil available near the burners.
Whiskey is the answer, but what was the question?


Online Peripatetic Phil

  • Genius Curry Master
  • Contributing member
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7843
  • Blessèd are those with an open mind ...
    • View Profile
    • The Westberry Hotel / Hôi~An Restaurant
Re: Butter, ghee, frying, temperatures, room heating, etc.
« Reply #77 on: December 03, 2020, 09:19 AM »
You only live once.  Eat fatty bacon, fry your eggs in butter ...

Dripping, Sir — beef dripping.  And fry your pancakes in lard.  Butter (in slices no less than 1/4" thick) should be reserved for hot cross buns and crumpets.  Oh, and ghee for frying paratha — I fried a couple this evening, and just reached instinctively for the tin of pure butter ghee ...

Quote
Drink your bourbon with real Coke.

Use your bourbon to de-grease your hob, and drink your real whisky (or whiskey, if you prefer Irish) at cask strength and uncontaminated with anything that fizzes.

** Phil.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2020, 09:06 PM by Peripatetic Phil »
Ogham's law :  The probable value of a message varies inversely as the number of emoticons and/or emoji that it contains.

Offline Gaspodia

  • Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 20
    • View Profile
Re: Butter, ghee, frying, temperatures, room heating, etc.
« Reply #78 on: December 03, 2020, 09:52 AM »
Strangely enough, I did save and then use some dripping left over from cooking a lamb keema a few weeks ago :D

I'd bought the minced lamb from a different source to my usual one and the mince was quite a bit fattier than I was expecting.  I' skimmed off an alarming amount of fat from the cooked dish and, because I never throw anything away, popped it into the fridge in a small container.  Fast forward a week when I rediscovered it as I was scrabbling around trying to see what I could make for lunch in the 20 mins I had to prep and eat it on a busy work day.  The drippings were added to leftover rice, nuked for 5 mins and called Lunch.  It tasted glorious!

Offline livo

  • Jedi Curry Master
  • *********
  • Posts: 2158
    • View Profile
Re: Butter, ghee, frying, temperatures, room heating, etc.
« Reply #79 on: December 03, 2020, 10:39 AM »
I once had a relationship with a young women training and starting work as a home economics teacher. Her mother was one as well and they came from the country, as in, not the city.  Think Country Woman's Association, pumpkin scones, cream and jam sponge cakes, laminations etc.  Back then frying real bacon for weekend breakfast inevitably left a goodly amount of rendered fat in the pan.  This was always diligently recovered, strained and stored in the fridge for use in other dishes requiring fat and flavour through the week.  It took a fair time to break the habit even long after we'd parted ways.
Whiskey is the answer, but what was the question?



 

  ©2021 Curry Recipes