Author Topic: Dishoom steamed basmati rice  (Read 2931 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online tempest63

  • Spice Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 616
    • View Profile
Dishoom steamed basmati rice
« on: June 11, 2023, 06:59 AM »
This is our everyday plain steamed rice. Everyone we have served it up to has asked for the recipe which comes from the Dishoom Cookbook

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dishoom-Bombay-Love-Shamil-Thakrar/dp/1408890674/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?crid=1PNQAGR8GJ9UX&keywords=dishoom+cookbook&qid=1686462872&sprefix=Dishoo%2Caps%2C154&sr=8-2-spons&sp_csd=d2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGY&psc=1

Basmati Rice (Mrs T63’s favourite rice)

This is a lengthier process than some rice cooking methods, but the end result will be perfectly fluffy rice, with each grain intact.

You will need a large pan with a lid (which is only used in Step 6)

Serves 4

Ingredients

360g basmati rice
2 teaspoons fine sea salt
A generous squeeze of lime juice, or 1 tablespoon spirit vinegar
25g unsalted butter (optional, but recommended)

Method.         

Fill a large bowl with cold water and gently add the rice. Move the rice around with your hands to help release the starch, let the rice settle to the bottom. Pour out the water and repeat this process until the water is clear (usually 3 to 4 times) cover the rice with fresh, cold water and leave to soak for one hour.

Pour 3 litres of boiling water into a large pan and add salt and lime juice or spirit vinegar. Bring to the boil

Cut a piece of foil large enough to comfortably cover the top of your pan.

Drain the rice and add it to the boiling water. Cook, stirring regularly until almost done: this should take 4 to 5 minutes and the rice should still be slightly firm in the centre.

Tip the rice into a sieve immediately; don’t shake off all the excess water. Return the rice to the still hot pan, shake the pan gently to create an even layer, then dot with butter, if using. Place the foil over the top of the pan and tightly crimp the edges around the edge of the pan. Place pan over high heat, until you see the foil dome up (inflate a little), about one minute.

Position the lid to seal. Turn off the heat and leave to stand, covered, for 15 to 30 minutes before serving.                     
« Last Edit: June 11, 2023, 07:09 AM by tempest63 »

Offline Robbo141

  • Indian Master Chef
  • ****
  • Posts: 392
    • View Profile
Re: Dishoom steamed basmati rice
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2023, 03:39 PM »
Very similar to my go-to.  6 mins hard boil, immediate drain, then into warmed dish, dot with butter and sit in the oven at 175 F for 30 mins.
Always buy aged basmati now. Makes a huge difference.

Why the vinegar or lime juice?


Robbo


Online tempest63

  • Spice Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 616
    • View Profile
Re: Dishoom steamed basmati rice
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2023, 05:34 AM »
Why the vinegar or lime juice?

I don’t have a clue, maybe it helps separate the grains?

Offline George

  • Jedi Curry Master
  • *********
  • Posts: 3382
    • View Profile
Re: Dishoom steamed basmati rice
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2023, 08:39 AM »
Why the vinegar or lime juice?


I don’t have a clue, maybe it helps separate the grains?

I guess it was the Dishoom cookbook which provided the option. I dislike options in recipes. Which did you use to get people asking for the recipe?


Online livo

  • Jedi Curry Master
  • *********
  • Posts: 2741
    • View Profile
Re: Dishoom steamed basmati rice
« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2023, 10:52 PM »
The obvious similarity is that they are both acidic (acetic and citric acids) and relatively tastless in small quantities. I would imagine that a pinch of powdered Citric Acid would have the same affect and this would be to do with pH adjustment of the water rather than flavouring.

Water chemistry variation can play a significant part in the final product of many things.  Consider beer and whiskey for example.  Perhaps cooking rice in low pH (ie acidic) water gives the desired texture and separation of grains.

Online livo

  • Jedi Curry Master
  • *********
  • Posts: 2741
    • View Profile
Re: Dishoom steamed basmati rice
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2023, 11:46 AM »
1) Possible flavour addition from vinegar or lime juice.
2) Acidity assists in break down of starch to help individual grain separation.
3) Reduces glycemic index. (So does reheating pre-cooked and cooled rice.)
4) Safer rice as acid acts to preserve. (Sushi rice seasoning is acidic.) Cooked rice can be problematic.

Offline Secret Santa

  • Genius Curry Master
  • **********
  • Posts: 3584
    • View Profile
Re: Dishoom steamed basmati rice
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2023, 07:11 PM »
Why the vinegar or lime juice?

It's just a pH adjuster as indicated by there being two options both of which are just acids (as livo has already pointed out). But the reason you'd want the water to be acidic, rather than basic, is because it produces a soft (or softer textured) rice. And much of the water in the UK is on the basic side of neutral pH. Good explanation in this web page: https://sciencemeetsfood.org/rice-science-101-introduction-making-great-rice-home/


 

  ©2024 Curry Recipes