Author Topic: The Hamburger  (Read 1688 times)

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Offline bhamcurry

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Re: The Hamburger
« Reply #10 on: August 30, 2023, 03:05 PM »
I'd smash that burger. Although I might put the pineapple on the side.

Does "smashing" imply "flattening with a hammer as an indication of disgust" or "enjoying with great relish" ?  And similar is putting the pineapple on the side positive or negative ?  I don't think that either of these idioms exist in British English ...

"smash it" is a (probably) US idiom meaning "enjoying with great relish, eating like a barbarian". The kind of eating that includes issues like "blast radius"  :lol:

UK gherkins are different from dill pickles. Dills are usually naturally fermented and tangy, with an aniseed-ish hint from the dill along with a subtle garlic hint.

I'd have the pineapple on the side of the plate to eat separately. I like pineapple, I liked pineapple and ham pizza, I like grilled pineapple. I'd just prefer to eat it and enjoy it on its own

Offline Secret Santa

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Re: The Hamburger
« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2023, 03:47 PM »
"smash it" is a (probably) US idiom meaning "enjoying with great relish, eating like a barbarian".

I generally try to avoid Americanisms but they're so ubiquitous it's easy to find you're using them without being aware. One I really like though is jonesing, as in I'm jonesing for some bacon, meaning having a craving for. Probably better than the English equivalent which is gagging for.


Offline Peripatetic Phil

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Re: The Hamburger
« Reply #12 on: August 30, 2023, 05:11 PM »
At the risk of appearing to be more familiar with street slang than I would wish to seem, isn't the idiom "gagging for it" normally used with reference to a lady of one's acquaintance, and is not also the suggestion that it is not food which she seeks but something rather more carnal ?
« Last Edit: August 30, 2023, 06:44 PM by Peripatetic Phil »

Offline Secret Santa

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Re: The Hamburger
« Reply #13 on: August 30, 2023, 06:48 PM »
At the risk of appearing to be more familiar with street slang than I would wish to seem, isn't the idiom "gagging for it" normally used with reference to a lady of one's acquaintance, and is not also the suggestion that it is not food which she seeks but something rather more carnal ?

You're not wrong but, at least in my circles, it's also just a generic expression of craving, as in I'm gagging for some bacon, meaning I'm craving bacon. Although there's a double entendre there too.


Offline livo

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Re: The Hamburger
« Reply #14 on: August 31, 2023, 12:55 AM »
Never heard of either Jonesing or gagging for anything.  We do have "keeping up with the Jones's", which is the term used to describe obtaining unnecessary things that others already have, simply to appear affluent, like buying a new TV when there is nothing wrong with the one you already have. 

Over here the appropriate slang would be hangin' or tonguin' or even dyin', as in one would be hangin' for a burger, tonguin' for a beer and dyin' for a swim.  Note that it is usual for Aussies to ignore the g on the end of words.  We would say for example, "Are you comin' or not?

Santa, I have to admit that while I have eaten the Works Burger, pineapple is not on my usual extras list.  Bacon ang egg, must have, and cheese is depending on mood.  I will also say that I fall into the beetroot camp of take it or leave it, but I don't object to it.



 

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