Author Topic: Japanese curry  (Read 974 times)

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Offline Robbo141

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Japanese curry
« on: June 10, 2024, 12:56 PM »
Hello all, been a while.  Hope you’re all still at it.
Back from my tour of Japan and it was incredible. The most beautiful places I’ve ever been to. I was pleasantly surprised at how widespread curry is in Japan.  There’s a fast food chain called CoCo Curry with over 1200 branches and their curry was delicious. Tons of choices and ready in minutes. Wish we had them here.


Robbo

Offline Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Japanese curry
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2024, 08:20 PM »
I  love Japan, Robbo (especially Kyoto) but I am afraid that, IMHO, their curries are not in the same league as (the better) BIR ones.  Looking at your photograph, I get the distinct impression that the sauce has been artificially thickened using potato starch (片栗粉 / katakuriko) or similar — was that the impression that you got when you ate it, or did it seem that the texture was derived purely from the vegetable and spice content ?


Offline Kashmiri Bob

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Re: Japanese curry
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2024, 09:50 PM »
Wow!  Looks amazing Robbo.  Would love to here more about your trip and the food. 

I trust you managed to acquire some of those logoed plates.  Absolutely brilliant idea!  Thinking ahead to Mick's Balti.  Butterflies fluttering and a 10/10 on the diagonal.  Porcelain.


Rob :)

Offline Robbo141

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Re: Japanese curry
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2024, 10:34 PM »
Honestly, the curry was very tasty, had way more depth than the (very good) version I make using those roux cubes. I watched a video on making from scratch and there’s a banana in it to thicken. I picked up no sweetness at all, just a great tasting dish. I wish I had picked up a branded plate now you mention it Rob.  Bugger.

That pic was from a CoCo Curry place in Kyoto. A wonderful city but very touristy.

In Kanazawa they served curry with breaded pork cutlet. I thought it seems odd, but it worked very well. Kanazawa a little more deep in flavor but not overly hot.

A5 wagyu beef is the most I’ve paid for a meal and worth every penny. Like nothing I’ve tasted before. Had it at a nice restaurant in Tokyo, then paid $40 for 2 skewers each with 5 pieces at a weekend market in Kanazawa.  Holiday splurge totally justified.

Stood in line for an hour to sit in individual booth and eat Ichiran ramen.  It’s fast food, but a unique experience.
And now my pantry is full of ramen ingredients.

We went up an active volcano to see Mt Fuji and at the top a restaurant sells hard boiled eggs cooked in the heat of the sulfurous volcano. It turns the egg shells black but the egg itself tasted perfectly normal. Apparently brings good luck.



Back to reality now..time to make some base.

Robbo






Offline Onions

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Re: Japanese curry
« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2024, 02:07 PM »
Did you come across those 1000-year-old eggs, Robbo? They sound a bit off-key, but shouldn't judge. Some of the things at the bottom of my freezer look like they've been in there a thousand years too  :smile2:

Offline Kashmiri Bob

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Re: Japanese curry
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2024, 07:46 PM »
Fabulous.  Once in a lifetime stuff.  The nearest I have got to Japanese food was a long time ago, at a conference in the US (Boston).  A group of Japanese delegates invited me back to their hotel for some food.  It was different, but amazing.  To this day I am not sure if they found the food there somewhere, or brought their own with them and somehow put it together themselves.  Was so good though.

More recently (still a long time ago) I almost went to a Japanese restaurant here in Birmingham city centre.  It was a friend's work leaving do.  I had an invite but couldn't make it.  Spoke to him the next day.  The food was great, but turns out he had one too many and decided to pay the entire bill for everyone present, and they let him. I think it was around 500 sheets, plus the tip.  I felt for him.  Had I been there it would have something like, no way Steve, I am sure we all agree on paying individually. It's your day and it's been a memorable evening.  Together, we must and insist on covering  your tab and the tip. We would also like to buy you a round and have a toast, or two, it's been a privilege working with you.  I knew all of this group.  Would have been interesting to watch the faces of those who ordered the most expensive starters on the menu (often two) and the pricey main course and multiple cocktails. Without fail, these would be the first to suggest, hey, let's spit the bill. Everyone agrees.

Anyway, rant over, where was I?  Yes, incredible experience Robbo.  I bet those skewers were something else.  Was in London recently and that kind of money (most I would have ever paid too) gets cheap and cheerful.  It's mad.  I read recently that, depending on the event, the O2 arena can demand £17.50 for a 330 ml bottle of beer.  Not sure if this is true, but would not be surprised if it is.  Birmingham these days is trying its best to keep up too.  There is a nice looking fish & chip shop near me.  Walk past it regularly and have to wobble my head looking at the menu.  You would soon get through your US 40 here.  The cheapest item on the menu is £0.99.  For this nominal amount you will get, and they make it clear, a "single" potato wedge.  I also saw, on the kid's menu, 5 chicken nuggets with fries and a can of pop, for £7.80.  These days, I increase my pace when walking past this chippy.  Last thing I noticed on the menu was a "bottle of vinegar".  £2.80!  Could be Sarson's original malt 569 ml, but I will never find out :)

Great post Robbo.  Keep them coming.

Rob

Offline Peripatetic Phil

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Re: Japanese curry
« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2024, 07:55 PM »
Had fish-and-chips from Trebonney in Roche earlier this week.  Cod, chips and mushy peas for just over £11-00.  Sufficient for two meals.  'Nuff said.  Oh, except that there is no way it will be Sarson's original malt vinegar — "non-brewed condiment" is standard fare in almost all British F-&-C shops.
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« Last Edit: June 13, 2024, 01:49 PM by Peripatetic Phil »


Offline Robbo141

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Re: Japanese curry
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2024, 03:46 PM »
No 1000 year old eggs and not sure I’d have tried them if I had.
There’s no tipping in Japan, which after living in the US 10 years and adding 20% to everything made a welcome change.
The Wagyu is all well and good, and I’d happily pay for it again, but I loved finding tiny restaurants by chance. Stumbled across this gyoza place in Kyoto that only sat 8 people. I too, this picture literally standing in the doorway. We got lucky as a couple were just leaving. Incredible chef, and very friendly Japanese ladies who’d dropped in on their way home from work.


In Arashiyama we stayed a night in a Ryokan where the room had its own natural hot spring bath (Onsen), and included in the exorbitant cost of the stay is a traditional nine course kaiseki dinner. One of which is here…food or art?


And breakfast…



Can’t wait to go back, despite the 13 hour flight..

Robbo

Offline Kashmiri Bob

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Re: Japanese curry
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2024, 09:06 AM »
Some seriously good looking spreads you had there Robbo.   Just checked my cupboards and am limited to 3 x S & B Golden Curry (Hot) which I haven't tried yet.  Also have an almost empty packet of Ueshima house blend coffee.  It's a start though.  Do you have any recommendations for Japanese cooking books etc?

Rob

Offline Robbo141

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Re: Japanese curry
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2024, 09:38 PM »
I really haven’t tried much Japanese cooking other than ramen. The missis insisted on making the noodles from scratch, she’s good like that.  I did find this Japanese chef on YouTube and made these daikon ‘steaks’ and they were delicious. His channel is full of good looking dishes.
https://youtu.be/WG2LH5hkbT0?si=MqS8-CAmV_z9qWOC

Robbo


 

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