Author Topic: Pressure cooking: What's a whistle or a toot?  (Read 5783 times)

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Offline beachbum

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Pressure cooking: What's a whistle or a toot?
« on: May 28, 2012, 02:17 AM »
I've been looking at some sites and blogs for traditional Indian veg curry recipes, we have a trad restaurant in Brisbane that serves a variety of non BIR style curries. They are absolutely delicious and seem to be "Vedic" style with the use of hing instead of onions and garlic,  but I have no idea how they create them - they can take potatoes and peas and have you in ecstasy after a fork full.

The thing that infuriates me is that the Indian sites, when discussing pressure cooking, often say "pressure cook for a couple of toots" or "pressure cook for three whistles". WTF do they mean by this? 

I know a whistle and toot is something a Cockney wears when he takes the Trouble down to the Rubbidy,  ;D but before I go in the comments sections on their blogs and start abusing them, I wondered if anyone here had an explanation, is it some feature of Indian pressure cookers?

Offline rockyholland

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Re: Pressure cooking: What's a whistle or a toot?
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2012, 08:16 AM »
I've been looking at some sites and blogs for traditional Indian veg curry recipes, we have a trad restaurant in Brisbane that serves a variety of non BIR style curries. They are absolutely delicious and seem to be "Vedic" style with the use of hing instead of onions and garlic,  but I have no idea how they create them - they can take potatoes and peas and have you in ecstasy after a fork full.

The thing that infuriates me is that the Indian sites, when discussing pressure cooking, often say "pressure cook for a couple of toots" or "pressure cook for three whistles". WTF do they mean by this? 

I know a whistle and toot is something a Cockney wears when he takes the Trouble down to the Rubbidy,  ;D but before I go in the comments sections on their blogs and start abusing them, I wondered if anyone here had an explanation, is it some feature of Indian pressure cookers?



A "whistle" or a "toot" is roughly 3 minutes.

This comes from a common type of pressure cooker in India different from the constant pressure type we're used to.

The pressure cooker they use has a fluctuating operation, pressure rises, cooker whistles or toots as steam escapes and pressure drops, pressure build up again and is again released etc etc.

Regards


Offline tempest63

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Re: Pressure cooking: What's a whistle or a toot?
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2012, 06:33 AM »
 [/quote]
I know a whistle and toot is something a Cockney wears when he takes the Trouble down to the Rubbidy,  ;D but before I go in the comments sections on their blogs and start abusing them, I wondered if anyone here had an explanation, is it some feature of Indian pressure cookers?
[/quote]


Whistle and Flute=Suit
Battle Cruiser=Boozer or Rub-a-Dub (Rubber)=Pub

Offline beachbum

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Re: Pressure cooking: What's a whistle or a toot?
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2012, 07:58 AM »
Aha thanks for that, I was on a site that said "cook for three toots" so that explains it.

Australian rhyming slang is derived from Cockney due to migrants from Britain (many were compulsory migrants  ;D)
and some of the variations are different to London. For example "bag" = suit (bag o' fruit) - it's still used amongst older generations, just half an hour ago I was having a home brewed beer or five with my old age pensioner neighbour from the next street and he said "Well I'd better make this the one for the frog" (frog n toad, road).

Some older people still use terms that are straight out of Dickens for example "cove" = bloke.

And it's still common to refer to Wellies as Blucher Boots, theory being that many early migrants may have actually been at the Battle of Waterloo and that General Blucher invented said boots, not Wellington who took credit for it. If you say Wellingtons or Wellies to most Aussies they don't know what you mean.

Love history  8)



 

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